User:ShadowfaxSTF

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Welcome to my page! Currently, I have only one major project to list here: the Teleporter Rewrite.

Teleporter Rewrite[edit]

Below is my recommended changes for the Teleporter (5e Class) page. Before-and-after comparisons (including reasons behind the changes!) are listed underneath each section.

All mechanic changes are explained in detail, but some common changes that aren't always explained include:

  • Spelling fixes
  • Grammar/wordiness improvements
  • Tonal changes to better resemble official D&D-style wording
  • Adding links (especially for spells)
  • Italics/capitals corrections (to match the the official rules here)

Teleporter[edit]

An orc swings his axe down at a female halfling… who suddenly disappears. His friend lets out a cry and falls over, stabbed in the back by the very same halfling. She vanishes and reappears on the outskirts of the battle by the goblin archer, who also drops dead. Once more she vanishes into fog, before a heavy blow lands on the first orc's temple from seemingly nowhere and the halfing reappears a good distance away. She brings her hand up to her mouth to give an exaggerated yawn before she smiles wickedly and disappears again.

A dwarven man in traveling clothes takes a battle stance, his clawed gauntlets shining in the light. The bugbear laughs as his goblin forces surround the poor dwarf across the room. His cackle is interrupted by a thunderclap and the sight of his goblins being blown back in every direction. Suddenly the dwarf is standing in front of him and delivering two furious blows into the large goblinoid’s solar plexus, the force of the strikes blowing holes in the back of the bugbear’s makeshift throne. The dwarf jumps back as his shifting form settles, then flicks his nose with his thumb and spits on the floor as he turns to leave. The bugbear slumps unconscious in his broken chair.

A half-elven spellcaster teleports friends and foes across the field of battle as he desires, controlling the tides of combat to halt the kobold forces. He rains fireballs on his foes, teleports groups of allies behind the enemy for a pincer attack, and even teleports a few enemies into the trees on the field. That’s when he notices a group of half-dragons approaching and readying powerful breath attacks. He shouts and the entire battlefield begins to shift slightly, the breath of the dragons fizzling out before their targets can be overrun, and the half-elf breathes heavy as blood trickles down his nose.

The slaad stands over the small gnome and chuckles as it reaches for the little woman. She instantly vanishes and the mad laugh of a gnome rings through the air. The slaad finds itself obscured by darkness, thanks to the 20-foot cube of stone that's appeared overhead and beginning to fall. The gnome lays atop the cube rolling in laughter as the cube slams into the ground.

Sneaks, casters, and brawlers… no matter the way a teleporter uses their abilities, they control the field of battle using their speedy movement and target control in a mix of magic and melee only they can accomplish.

Compare Changes 
Before After

An orc swings his axe down at a female halfling… just as she disappears stabbing his friend in the back before again disappearing to kill a goblin archer on the outskirts of a battle, disappearing into fog as she lands a heavy blow to the first orcs temple and appears once more a good distance away. She brings her hand up to her mouth to give an exaggerated yawn before she smiles wickedly jumping forward before once again disappearing.

A dwarven man in traveling clothes takes a battle stance, his clawed gauntlets shinning in the light. The bugbear laughs as his goblin forces surround the poor dwarf across the room, but is silenced by the sound of thunder as he watches the goblins blown away. Suddenly the dwarf lands two furious blows into the large goblinoid’s solar plexus, the force of the blows blowing holes in the back of the bugbears makeshift throne. The dwarf jumps back, his shifting form settling, flicks his nose with his thumb, spitting on the floor as he turns to leave, the bugbear slumping unconscious in his broken chair.

A half-elven spell caster teleports his and the enemy forces across the field of battle, controlling the tides as he sees them, casting powerful spells to stop the kobold forces. He drops fireballs across the enemy forces, teleports groups of allies behind the enemy for a pincer attack, even teleports a few enemies into the trees on the field. That’s when he notices a group of half dragons appearing ready to launch their powerful breath attacks. The half-elf shouts and the entire battlefield begins to shift slightly, the breath of the dragons fizzling out before they are over run, the half elf breathes heavy as blood trickles down his nose.

The slaad stands over the small gnome chuckling as it reaches out for the little woman. As he reaches suddenly the gnome disappears and the mad laugh of a gnome rings out as the slaad is obscured by darkness, a 20 foot cube of stone appearing in the sky beginning to fall. The gnome sits atop the cube rolling in laughter as the cube slams into the ground.

Sneaks, casters, and brawlers, no matter the way the teleporter uses their abilities, they control the field of battle using their speedy movement and target control in a mix of magic and melee only they accomplish.

An orc swings his axe down at a female halfling… who suddenly disappears. His friend lets out a cry and falls over, stabbed in the back by the very same halfling. She vanishes and reappears on the outskirts of the battle by the goblin archer, who also drops dead. Once more she vanishes into fog, before a heavy blow lands on the first orc's temple from seemingly nowhere and the halfing reappears a good distance away. She brings her hand up to her mouth to give an exaggerated yawn before she smiles wickedly and disappears again.

A dwarven man in traveling clothes takes a battle stance, his clawed gauntlets shining in the light. The bugbear laughs as his goblin forces surround the poor dwarf across the room. His cackle is interrupted by a thunderclap and the sight of his goblins being blown back in every direction. Suddenly the dwarf is standing in front of him and delivering two furious blows into the large goblinoid’s solar plexus, the force of the strikes blowing holes in the back of the bugbear’s makeshift throne. The dwarf jumps back as his shifting form settles, then flicks his nose with his thumb and spits on the floor as he turns to leave. The bugbear slumps unconscious in his broken chair.

A half-elven spellcaster teleports friends and foes across the field of battle as he desires, controlling the tides of combat to halt the kobold forces. He rains fireballs on his foes, teleports groups of allies behind the enemy for a pincer attack, and even teleports a few enemies into the trees on the field. That’s when he notices a group of half-dragons approaching and readying powerful breath attacks. He shouts and the entire battlefield begins to shift slightly, the breath of the dragons fizzling out before their targets can be overrun, and the half-elf breathes heavy as blood trickles down his nose.

The slaad stands over the small gnome and chuckles as it reaches for the little woman. She instantly vanishes and the mad laugh of a gnome rings through the air. The slaad finds itself obscured by darkness, thanks to the 20-foot cube of stone that's appeared overhead and beginning to fall. The gnome lays atop the cube rolling in laughter as the cube slams into the ground.

Sneaks, casters, and brawlers… no matter how a teleporter uses their abilities, they control the field of battle using their speedy movement and target control in a mix of magic and melee only they can accomplish.

Reasons for Change(s)
These are some great stories. Grammar needs a little tweaking though, especially with some of the sentences running on too long. Swapped out some word choices too for smoothness.

Walker of the Planes[edit]

The planes have long overlapped, touching each other in particularly thin points… while wars for good and evil, law and chaos waged through them all. While other magic users dabble in movement through and across the planes, few do it as often (or as well) as the teleporter. Walking through the planes, whether as a source of mischief or order, good or evil, they always keep moving. Embracing the moments afforded them by this gift (or curse), they find themselves at home wherever and whenever is necessary. The magic of the planes is everywhere and they get to decide where it takes everyone around them.

They create chaos on the battlefield, moving across the land in a flash using hit and run tactics, keeping allies from being damaged with their access to powerful magics, affording them great versatility in positioning and planning that most others are unable to accomplish. Their abilities are limited, however, and since over-extending their powers is physically damaging to their health, rarely is a teleporter able to accomplish their goals before their ability consumes them.

Compare Changes 
Before After

The planes have long overlapped, touching each other in particularly thin points, the war for good and evil, law and chaos waged through them all. While others who use magic dabble in movement through and across the planes few do it as often or as well as the teleporter. Walking through the planes being a source of mischief or order, good or evil, they always keep moving. Embracing the moments afforded them by this gift, or curse, they find themselves at home wherever and whenever is necessary. The magic of the planes is everywhere and they get to decide where it takes everyone around them.

<tab character>They create chaos on the battlefield, moving across the field of battle in a flash using hit and run tactics, keeping allies from being damaged with their access to powerful magics, affording them great versatility in positioning and planning that many others are unable to accomplish. This is limited however and if they over extend their abilities physically damaging to their health, but rarely are they unable to accomplish their goals before their ability consumes them.

The planes have long overlapped, touching each other in particularly thin points… while wars for good and evil, law and chaos waged through them all. While other magic users dabble in movement through and across the planes, few do it as often (or as well) as the teleporter. Walking through the planes, whether as a source of mischief or order, good or evil, they always keep moving. Embracing the moments afforded them by this gift (or curse), they find themselves at home wherever and whenever is necessary. The magic of the planes is everywhere and they get to decide where it takes everyone around them.

They create chaos on the battlefield, moving across the land in a flash using hit and run tactics, keeping allies from being damaged with their access to powerful magics, affording them great versatility in positioning and planning that most others are unable to accomplish. Their abilities are limited, however, and since over-extending their powers is physically damaging to their health, rarely is a teleporter able to accomplish their goals before their ability consumes them.

Reasons for Change(s)
Simplified wording to making sentences smoother, replaced "unable" with "able" to better reflect the contextual meaning.

A Life of Flux[edit]

The other arcane and divine casters of the planes may dabble in planar movement, teleportation, and blinking, but none of them are entwined and untwined so perfectly with them. Space is at the fingertips of the teleporter and they move through it as if it didn’t truly have laws. The arcane magics so deftly weaved into themselves, it is more of a muscle than an art to advance as they do, and they do enjoy advancing.

As rare as they are, teleporters sharing a common goal is even rarer. Some wish to understand the arcane weave that is within them, others want to hoard gold and treasures, others want to protect the people of all planes in whatever way they can. Sometimes they are friends who, depending on the goal, may become enemies. But no matter the goal, they are a boon for friends and an annoying bane for their enemies.

Compare Changes 
Before After

The other arcane and divine casters of the planes may dabble in planar movement, teleportation, and blinking, but none of them are entwined and untwined so perfectly with them. Space is at the fingertips of the teleporter and they move through it as if it didn’t truly have laws. The arcane magics so deftly weaved into themselves, it is more of a muscle then an art advancing as they do, and they do enjoy advancing.

<tab-character>As rare as they are, teleporters having a common goal between themselves is even rarer. Some wish to understand the arcane weave that is within in them, others want to hoard gold and treasures, others want to protect the people of all planes in whatever way they can. Sometimes they are friends and later they may be enemies depending on current goals, and no matter what the goal is though they are a boon for friends and an annoying bane for their enemies.

The other arcane and divine casters of the planes may dabble in planar movement, teleportation, and blinking, but none of them are entwined and untwined so perfectly with them. Space is at the fingertips of the teleporter and they move through it as if it didn’t truly have laws. The arcane magics so deftly weaved into themselves, it is more of a muscle than an art to advance as they do, and they do enjoy advancing.

As rare as they are, teleporters sharing a common goal is even rarer. Some wish to understand the arcane weave that is within them, others want to hoard gold and treasures, others want to protect the people of all planes in whatever way they can. Sometimes they are friends who, depending on the goal, may become enemies; but no matter the goal, they are a boon for friends and an annoying bane for their enemies.

Reasons for Change(s)
Improved grammar.

Creating a Teleporter[edit]

Where did your powers come from? Did you anger an elder god who then left you cursed? Gifted by a deity to explore the planes? Was family stolen from you by an infernal and in your attempt at revenge, an accident left you this way? The way in which you connected to the magics of all the planes is important to your existence moving forward.

Do you enjoy these powers? Are they a happy curiosity, or does it unnerve you? Do you want to connect more deeply with these magics or use them to augment your physical abilities? Is this power to be used sparingly or is it the perfect tool for minor pranks? Would you have refused this power if you could, or wish you could return it now? Is this your perfect chance to save all the creatures of the planes or do you prefer to use these spells for personal gain only? Is your goal to learn about all the planes or simply to explore with an adventurer’s heart? Your connection to the planes should also be explored… how has your plane walking manifested itself? Have you only shifted in your own plane, perhaps zoning out during a leisurely stroll only to appear at your destination many miles away? Were you forced by the entity who gave you these powers to complete a quest in another plane? Or have you gotten lost in your travels before, once struggling to find your way back to the material? You are a walker of the planes and this affords you many responsibilities, or at the least, many powers to enforce your will. How your powers have affected you, and your outlook of those around you, is up to your capable and creative hands.

Compare Changes 
Before After

<div class="externalimage-holder" style="width:50%"> {​{​ 5e Image|float:right|<!--link to an image-->|<!--Caption, art credit, link to source-->​}​}</div>

So where did your powers come from? Did you anger an elder god and were cursed? Gifted by a deity to explore the planes? Was family stolen from you by an infernal and an accident attempting to take revenge left you this way? The way in which you connected to the magics of all the planes is important to your existence moving forward.

<tab character>Do you enjoy these powers? Are they a happy curiosty, or does it unnerve you? Do you want to connect more deeply with these magics or prefer to use them to your benefit yourself as best you can physically? Is this power to be used sparingly or is it the perfect tool for minor pranks? Would you have refused this power if you could or wish you could return it now? Is this your perfect chance to save all the creatures of the planes or do you prefer to use these spells for your gain only? Is your goal to learn about all the planes or simply to explore with an adventurer’s heart? Your connection to the planes should also be explored, why have you decided to return to the material? Have you been forced by the entity who gave you your power or have you gotten lost again in your travels, have you discovered a plot to take over the material plane or are you merely homesick and attempting to find your way back there? You are a walker of the planes and this affords you many responsibilities if you so choose, or perhaps it affords you many powers to enforce your will, how your powers have affected you, your outlook and those around you is up to your capable and creative hands.

Where did your powers come from? Did you anger an elder god who then left you cursed? Gifted by a deity to explore the planes? Was family stolen from you by an infernal and in your attempt at revenge, an accident left you this way? The way in which you connected to the magics of all the planes is important to your existence moving forward.

Do you enjoy these powers? Are they a happy curiosity, or does it unnerve you? Do you want to connect more deeply with these magics or use them to augment your physical abilities? Is this power to be used sparingly or is it the perfect tool for minor pranks? Would you have refused this power if you could, or wish you could return it now? Is this your perfect chance to save all the creatures of the planes or do you prefer to use these spells for personal gain only? Is your goal to learn about all the planes or simply to explore with an adventurer’s heart? Your connection to the planes should also be explored… how has your plane walking manifested itself? Have you only shifted in your own plane, perhaps zoning out during a leisurely stroll only to appear at your destination many miles away? Were you forced by the entity who gave you these powers to complete a quest in another plane? Or have you gotten lost in your travels before, once struggling to find your way back to the material? You are a walker of the planes and this affords you many responsibilities, or at the least, many powers to enforce your will. How your powers have affected you, and your outlook of those around you, is up to your capable and creative hands.

Reasons for Change(s)
This creation text assumes the character has definitely taken the Planar Traveler background and traveled to multiple planes already. But that's not a safe assumption to make... what if I wanted a criminal background, be someone who has only used their teleportation powers for petty theft and been too scared to explore beyond that (until now)? I recommend tweaking the couple sentences discussing planes to support a planar traveler but not require it.

Looks like there was an attempt to show an image, but it's broken so it should just be removed.

There's also the usual wording changes to clarify ideas and make sentences smoother to read.

Quick Build

You can make a teleporter quickly by following these suggestions. First, Charisma should be your highest ability score, followed by Dexterity or Strength. Second, choose the planar traveler background.

Compare Changes 
Before After

You can make a teleporter quickly by following these suggestions. First, Charisma should be your highest ability score, followed by Dexterity or Strength.  Second, choose the Plane Traveler background. Third, choose bladed fists, explorer’s pack, leather armor, and 2 daggers.

You can make a teleporter quickly by following these suggestions. First, Charisma should be your highest ability score, followed by Dexterity or Strength. Second, choose the planar traveler background.

Reasons for Change(s)
Disclaimer: this is a debatable recommendation that breaks the 5e Class Design Guide template convention, but I feel it will be beneficial.

In D&D books, the Quick Build section of classes never recommend starting equipment, and I'm not sure adding one here is beneficial. For example, I cannot find an item named "bladed fists" in any D&D books or even on this homebrew site, so I'm not sure why it's suggested... "leather armor" means they don't gain access to a shortbow, meaning this assumes they want a close-combat fighting style (and won't want ranged Plane Manipulator caster down the road) when choosing melee-vs-range combat is best left as a player decision... and then suggesting players take "2 daggers" when it's already automatically given them in the starting equipment doesn't make sense. Just simplify and the drop the line.

Also, fixed the link.

Class Features

As a Teleporter you gain the following class features.

Hit Points

Hit Dice: 1d8 per Teleporter level
Hit Points at 1st Level: 1d8 + Constitution modifier
Hit Points at Higher Levels: 1d8 (or 5) + Constitution modifier per Teleporter level after 1st

Proficiencies

Armor: Light armor
Weapons: Simple weapons, Martial glove weapons
Tools: None
Saving Throws: Charisma, Dexterity
Skills: Choose three skills from Acrobatics, Arcana, Deception, Insight, Intimidation, Perception, Persuasion, and Stealth

Equipment

You start with the following equipment, in addition to the equipment granted by your background:

  • (a) a simple weapon or (b) a martial glove weapon
  • (a) a dungeoneer’s pack or (b) an explorer’s pack
  • (a) a shortbow and 20 arrows or (b) 2 daggers
  • leather armor

Table: The Teleporter

Level Proficiency
Bonus
Features Spell Level Known Total Teleport Points
1st +2 Shifted in the Planes 2nd 5
2nd +2 Teleport Proficiency 2nd 6
3rd +2 Combative Teleportation 3rd 7
4th +2 Ability Score Improvement 3rd 8
5th +3 Range Extension 4th 11
6th +3 Combative Teleportation feature 4th 12
7th +3 Space Warping 5th 13
8th +3 Ability Score Improvement 5th 14
9th +4 Friendly Phase 6th 17
10th +4 Phased Plane 6th 18
11th +4 Combative Teleportation feature 7th 19
12th +4 Ability Score Improvement 7th 20
13th +5 Connected Doors 8th 23
14th +5 Tagged Teleport 8th 23
15th +5 Transport Sigils 9th 25
16th +5 Ability Score Improvement 9th 26
17th +6 Combative Teleportation feature 9th 29
18th +6 Reality Manipulator 9th 30
19th +6 Ability Score Improvement 9th 31
20th +6 Spatial Transmission 9th 32
Compare Changes 
Before After

​|name= Teleporter

​|summary=

​|hd=1d8

​|spellcasting=<!--half-->

​|armor= Light

​|weapons= Simple weapons, Martial weapon gloves

​|tools= None

​|saves= Charisma, Dexterity

​|skills= choose 3 from Acrobatics, Arcana, Deception, Insight, Intimidation, Perception, Persuasion, Stealth

​|item1a= any simple weapon

​|item1b= any gloved martial weapon

​|item1c=

​|item2a= dungeoneer’s pack

​|item2b= explorer’s pack

​|item2c=

​|item3a= shortbow and 20 arrows

​|item3b= leather armor

​|item3c=

​|item4a= 2 daggers

​|item4b=

​|item4c=

​|wealth= 3d4 x 10 gp

​|classfeatures1= Shifted in the Planes <!--In the above format list a name of the class features at 1st level.-->

​|classfeatures2= Teleport Proficiency <!--In the above format list a name of the class features at 2nd level.-->

​|classfeatures3= Combative Teleportation <!--In the above format list a name of the class features at 3rd level.-->

​|classfeatures4=

​|classfeatures5= Range Extension

​|classfeatures6= Combative Teleportation feature

​|classfeatures7= Space Warping

​|classfeatures8=

​|classfeatures9= Friendly Phase

​|classfeatures10= Phased Plane

​|classfeatures11= Combative Teleportation feature

​|classfeatures12=

​|classfeatures13= Connected Doors

​|classfeatures14= Tagged Teleport 

​|classfeatures15= Transport Sigils

​|classfeatures16=

​|classfeatures17= Combative Teleportation feature

​|classfeatures18= Reality Manipulator

​|classfeatures19=

​|classfeatures20= Spatial Transmission

​ 

​|extrasonleft=

​|extra1_name=<!--The name of the feature, e.g. Ki Points, Cantrips Known, or Sneak Attack. You can add more columns as extra2, extra3, etc.-->

​|extra1_1=<!--The values at each level go here-->

​|extra1_2=

​|extra1_3=

​|extra1_4=

​|extra1_5=

​|extra1_6=

​|extra1_7=

​|extra1_8=

​|extra1_9=

​|extra1_10=

​|extra1_11=

​|extra1_12=

​|extra1_13=

​|extra1_14=

​|extra1_15=

​|extra1_16=

​|extra1_17=

​|extra1_18=

​|extra1_19=

​|extra1_20=

​|name=Teleporter

​|summary=Able to use teleportation instinctively, teleporters excel in hit-and-run combat and battlefield manipulation

​|hd=1d8

​|spellcasting=

​|armor=Light armor

​|weapons=Simple weapons, Martial glove weapons

​|tools=None

​|saves=Charisma, Dexterity

​|skills=Choose three skills from Acrobatics, Arcana, Deception, Insight, Intimidation, Perception, Persuasion, and Stealth

​|item1a=a simple weapon

​|item1b=a martial glove weapon

​|item1c=

​|item2a=a dungeoneer’s pack

​|item2b=an explorer’s pack

​|item2c=

​|item3a=a shortbow and 20 arrows

​|item3b=2 daggers

​|item3c=

​|item4a=leather armor

​|item4b=

​|item4c=

​|wealth=

​|classfeatures1=Shifted in the Planes

​|classfeatures2=Teleport Proficiency

​|classfeatures3=Combative Teleportation

​|classfeatures4=

​|classfeatures5=Range Extension

​|classfeatures6=Combative Teleportation feature

​|classfeatures7=Space Warping

​|classfeatures8=

​|classfeatures9=Friendly Phase

​|classfeatures10=Phased Plane

​|classfeatures11=Combative Teleportation feature

​|classfeatures12=

​|classfeatures13=Connected Doors

​|classfeatures14=Tagged Teleport

​|classfeatures15=Transport Sigils

​|classfeatures16=

​|classfeatures17=Combative Teleportation feature

​|classfeatures18=Reality Manipulator

​|classfeatures19=

​|classfeatures20=Spatial Transmission

​|extrasonleft=

​|extra1_name=Spell Level Known

​|extra1_1=2nd

​|extra1_2=2nd

​|extra1_3=3rd

​|extra1_4=3rd

​|extra1_5=4th

​|extra1_6=4th

​|extra1_7=5th

​|extra1_8=5th

​|extra1_9=6th

​|extra1_10=6th

​|extra1_11=7th

​|extra1_12=7th

​|extra1_13=8th

​|extra1_14=8th

​|extra1_15=9th

​|extra1_16=9th

​|extra1_17=9th

​|extra1_18=9th

​|extra1_19=9th

​|extra1_20=9th

​|extra2_name=Total Teleport Points

​|extra2_1=5

​|extra2_2=6

​|extra2_3=7

​|extra2_4=8

​|extra2_5=11

​|extra2_6=12

​|extra2_7=13

​|extra2_8=14

​|extra2_9=17

​|extra2_10=18

​|extra2_11=19

​|extra2_12=20

​|extra2_13=23

​|extra2_14=24

​|extra2_15=25

​|extra2_16=26

​|extra2_17=29

​|extra2_18=30

​|extra2_19=31

​|extra2_20=32

Reasons for Change(s)
Breakdown of the suggestions:
Added summary

The 5e Class Design Guide says that having a summary is important for users to be able to discover this class even exists.

Replaced "light" with "light armor", "explorer’s pack" with "an explorer’s pack", etc.

Wording was tweaked in several places to be consistent with what most D&D classes normally say.

Replaced "gloved martial weapon" usages with "martial glove weapon"

This homebrew site actually has an official category for Martial Glove Weapons, so let's use that name.

Removed "If you are using starting wealth, you have 3d4 x 10 gp in funds."

Generally in D&D, starting wealth does not come from one's class but from one's background. Unless there is a reason, let's not break precedent.

Replaced "* (a) shortbow and 20 arrows or (b) leather armor" + "2 daggers" with "(a) a shortbow and 20 arrows or (b) 2 daggers" + "leather armor"

There is no official D&D class that does not have armor of some sort. Barbarians and Monks get "Unarmored Defense", Sorcerers and Wizards get to cast "Mage Armor", and everyone else gets normal armor according to their proficiencies. It seems unusual (and a little unfair) that teleporters favoring ranged damage are exceptions with no armor. It would make much more sense to let them pick between melee and ranged damage, that is, between daggers and shortbow.

Added a new "Spell Level Known" restriction to the class.

Consider this hypothetical:

  • At level 1 with 14 Charisma, a Teleporter will have 3 teleport points.
  • Death occurs at exhaustion level 6.
  • Since they may spend points over what they have (incurring a level of exhaustion per 2 points beyond what is paid), that means they may spend up to 11 teleport points beyond the 3 without instantly dying of exhaustion.
  • This means a Level 1 character can spend 14 teleport points to cast a Level 9 "Gate" spell.

Yes, a Level 1 character can open a gate to the Negative Plane over a city, inflict massive energy damage to its inhabitants who (upon dying) become undead... and the city is effectively destroyed. This is a disproportionate amount of power given to a character that can still easily die from a surprise goblin attack. Let's at least let the characters earn their earth-shattering abilities over time in the form of leveling up. I recommend adding a spell level cap that increases as they level.

Added a new "Total Teleport Points" column.

Explained in the Shifted in the Planes changes below.

Shifted in the Planes[edit]

You feel the effects of being out of phase with the planes, and can instinctively use teleporter spells.

Compare Changes 
Before After

At 1st level the teleporter has begun to feel the effects of being out of phase with the planes. They have access to all of the Teleportation spells

You feel the effects of being out of phase with the planes, and can instinctively use teleporter spells.

Reasons for Change(s)
As with all magic-using classes, this spellcasting feature has enough complexity that it deserves a proper spellcasting section to keep the rules clear for players. Without it, players are forced to make a few educated guesses (based on their experiences with other spellcasting classes) and that's just not an ideal way to play a class. Let's break the feature down into the usual spells known, spell slots (in this case, replaced by teleport points), spellcasting ability, and spellcasting focus.
Spells Known

At 1st level, you know all Cantrips and 2nd-level Spells from the teleporter spell list (there are no 1st-level spells from the list).

The Spell Level Known column of the Teleporter table shows the level of teleporter spells⁠ you know. When you reach 5th level, for example, you learn all 4th-level spells from the teleporter spell list, in additional to the Cantrips, 2nd-level, and 3rd-level spells you already know from the list.

Compare Changes 
Before After

They have access to all of the Teleportation spells, the cost of using such spells is an amount of teleport points.

At 1st level, you know all Cantrips and 2nd-level Spells from the teleporter spell list (there are no 1st-level spells from the list).

The Spell Level Known column of the Teleporter table shows the level of teleporter spells⁠ you know. When you reach 5th level, for example, you learn all 4th-level spells from the teleporter spell list, in additional to the Cantrips, 2nd-level, and 3rd-level spells you already know from the list.

Reasons for Change(s)
This describes the Spell Level Known column added to Table: The Teleporter. The reason for adding it is described in the table's "compare changes" section (under: Added a new "Spell Level Known" restriction to the class.)
Teleport Points

To cast one of your teleporter spells of 1st level or higher, you expend teleport points instead of spell slots. The Teleporter Spell Costs table shows how many points these spells cost by level. The Total Teleport Points column of the Teleporter table shows the total points you have, which is always equal to your Teleporter level + double your Proficiency bonus. You regain all expended points after finishing a long rest.

You can never have less than 0 teleport points. However, you can spend more points than you have at a penalty: for every 2 teleport points over the amount actually expended to cast a spell (if the difference is 1 point, treat it as if it's 2), you gain a level of exhaustion after your spell is cast.

Casting an 8th-level or 9th-level teleportation spell is physically demanding, and if you have not finished a long rest since casting one, each additional casting incurs two additional levels of exhaustion and requires a roll on the Wild Magic Surge table after your spell is cast.

Compare Changes 
Before After

(all text)

They have access to all of the Teleportation spells, the cost of using such spells is an amount of teleport points. For every 2 teleport points over the amount actually paid to cast a spell the Teleportrer gains a point of exhaustion. Teleport points are equal to charisma modifier • Teleporter Lvl. The spell modifier for these spells is proficiency modifier + Charasima modifier and the spell save Dc is proficiency modifier + charisma modifier + 8. The teleport points available are restored to the current max at the end of a long rest. Casting level 8 and 9 spells is so physically demanding that it permanently lowers the amount of teleport points available by the amount of points used until a long rest is completed. Casting more than one level 8 or 9 spell per short rest causes a point of exhaustion, casting more than 2 causes 2 points of exhaustion and requires a roll on the wild magic surge table.

(all text)

To cast one of your teleporter spells of 1st level or higher, you expend teleport points instead of spell slots. The Teleporter Spell Costs table shows how many points these spells cost by level. The Total Teleport Points column of the Teleporter table shows the total points you have, which is always equal to your Teleporter level + double your Proficiency bonus. You regain all expended points after finishing a long rest.

You can never have less than 0 teleport points. However, you can spend more points than you have at a penalty: for every 2 teleport points over the amount actually expended to cast a spell (if the difference is 1 point, treat it as if it's 2), you gain a level of exhaustion after your spell is cast.

Casting an 8th-level or 9th-level teleportation spell is physically demanding, and if you have not finished a long rest since casting one, each additional casting incurs two additional levels of exhaustion and requires a roll on the Wild Magic Surge table after your spell is cast.

Reasons for Change(s)
Glossing over some wording and grammar tweaks, here are the major recommended changes and the rationale behind them.
Replace "Teleportation" spells with "Teleporter" spells

This class technically doesn't grant access to all teleportation spells... it only gives access to the teleporter spell list. This list doesn't have teleportation circle -- one of the most famous of all teleportation spells, for example -- instead, the Plane Manipulator gets a unique and (imho) more fun version of it instead. So let's be clear on what access is being given here.

Cantrips had an unknown teleport point cost

The text "They have access to all of the Teleportation spells, the cost of using such spells is an amount of teleport points." clearly says that *spells cost teleport points*. But what about cantrip spells? The line provides no guidance on point costs (and doesn't even point to the Teleporter Spell Costs table, though we all know it means to), and the table doesn't mention cantrips either. Although we can logically deduce that teleport points replace spell slots, and since cantrips cost no spell slots, cantrips probably don't cost teleport points either... let's not leave it vague.

Replace use of exhaustion "points" with "levels"

D&D only refers to exhaustion units as levels, so let's be consistent with the precedent to avoid confusing players.

Definition of total teleport points is vague

The sentence "Teleport points are equal to" sounds like it's about to follow with "...spell slots" or something that defines what an individual teleport point is. Instead, it says "charisma modifier • Teleporter Lvl". This could be a little confusing, let's just add the word "Total" before it.

The total teleport points formula does not scale well

The formula charisma modifier • Teleporter Lvl introduces a few risks:

1. It doesn't scale well for high-level characters.

I would not be surprised if a Level 20 character had 22 Charisma, with a modifier of +6. Since 20 * 6 = 120, that means they could cast 9 Gate spells per day (they just need enough money - not impossible at that level) and still have a few points to spare. That's more power than any spellcaster in the D&D universe has, even Vecna. I won't even elaborate what a technically-not-impossible 30 Charisma teleporter could do with their 600 teleport points.

2. It doesn't scale well for low-Charisma characters.

You've expressed a desire to allow Teleporters to access all kinds of teleportation spells (makes sense, it's the whole purpose of the class). But with the above formula, those who invest in Str/Dex first and Chr second (perhaps a brawler) will simply never be able to use most spells in the early levels. At Level 5, the brawler with +1 Chr has 5 teleport points (enough for Misty Step + cantrips only) and the +3 Chr magic-centric user has 15 teleport points (enough to cast literally any teleporter spell). That discrepancy is quite discriminatory to brawler types. Then there's the 10 Charisma characters who didn't roll good stats, and have no teleport points at all. I won't even ask what negative Charisma causes.

When it comes to leveling, most D&D spellcasting classes only use spellcasting modifiers to limit how many spells a character can prepare or know... not how many spells they can cast per day... to avoid this very problem.

I strongly recommend just borrowing from the Spell Slot mechanic and allow all teleporters to cast the same number of spells. I would recommend the available teleport points available per day be double your Proficiency bonus + their Teleporter level. This allows a Level 1 teleporter (5 points) to safely use a cool teleporter spell (Misty Step) once per day, an excellent taste of what's to come... by Level 20 (32 points), they can summon two almighty Solar with "Gate" and still have points to spare.

I realize this point range (5 to 32) is a drastic reduction from the original range the algorithm allowed (-100 to 600)... but this class has so many cool abilities already, the restriction back to normal D&D numbers shouldn't much detract from the fun.

Adjusted exhaustion penalty text

1. With the above formula change, the penalty text should be simplified to match. Since now it is only possible to cast 2 9th-level spells per day maximum (which is still more than a Level 20 Wizard can do).

2. The requirement to avoid the penalty should not say "per short rest". There are three reasons: 1. The wording is against homebrew best practices (see the Recharge section of the 5e Class Design Guide) and could be replaced with "if you have not finished a short rest". 2. It doesn't take long rests into account. A character can cast Gate, long rest, cast Gate again and technically have violated the short-rest rule and so receives the exhaustion penalty. 3. Players can cast unlimited 9th-level spells in a day (until they run out of points), as long as they short rest after each casting (D&D rules don't limit how many short rests there are in a day). Again using the Wizard class in comparison, as it's the most magically powerful base class and only gets 1 9th-level spell per day... this "unlimited 9th level spells" rule seems pretty overpowered compared to all other spellcasters. All this can be resolved by tweaking the rule to require finishing a long-rest instead.

3. It is not specified when the penalty takes effect. Is it before casting the spell? During? After? Keep in mind enough exhaustion results in death... so the question then should be... if a super-exhausted player is making a last desperate 8th-level spell to save the day, should he die before, during, or after the casting? I would argue after, to make for a more meaningful final moment on their deathbed. So let's add the word "after" in there where appropriate.

Teleporter Spell Costs
Spell Level Teleport Point Cost
Level 1 2 Teleport points
Level 2 3 Teleport points
Level 3 5 Teleport points
Level 4 6 Teleport points
Level 5 7 Teleport points
Level 6 9 Teleport points
Level 7 10 Teleport points
Level 8 11 Teleport points
Level 9 13 Teleport points
Spellcasting Ability

Charisma is your spellcasting ability for your teleporter spells, since the power of your magic relies on your ability to project your will into the world. You use your Charisma whenever a spell refers to your spellcasting ability. In addition, you use your Charisma modifier when setting the saving throw DC for a teleporter spell you cast and when making an attack roll with one.

Spell save DC = 8 + your Proficiency Bonus + your Charisma modifier
Spell attack modifier = your Proficiency Bonus + your Charisma modifier
Compare Changes 
Before After

The spell modifier for these spells is proficiency modifier + Charasima modifier and the spell save Dc is proficiency modifier + charisma modifier + 8.

Charisma is your spellcasting ability for your teleporter spells, since the power of your magic relies on your ability to project your will into the world. You use your Charisma whenever a spell refers to your spellcasting ability. In addition, you use your Charisma modifier when setting the saving throw DC for a teleporter spell you cast and when making an attack roll with one.

Reasons for Change(s)
Now that a proper "Spellcasting Ability" section exists, we can do what all other D&D classes do and put the spell attack modifier + spell attack DC formulas on their own lines. It doesn't have to clutter the text.

Also, although it's implied, the Teleporter's spellcasting ability was never actually defined as Charisma, so let's get that in there.

Spellcasting Focus

You cast teleporter spells innately without the need for an arcane focus.

Compare Changes 
Before After

You cast teleporter spells innately without the need for an arcane focus.

Reasons for Change(s)
Although it's implied, whether this class needs a spellcasting focus is never actually stated. I presume it does not.

Teleport Proficiency[edit]

Starting at 2nd level, simple teleportation spells become second nature to you. Teleporter spells that require 1 action to cast, teleport you, are instantaneous, and do not require material components or concentration may be cast as a bonus action. For example, Minor Step, Thunder Step, Dimension Door, Arcane Gate, and Teleport can now be cast with either 1 action or 1 bonus action.

As normal, after casting any spell (even with a bonus action), you can't cast another spell during the same turn, except for a cantrip with a casting time of 1 action.

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(all text)

At 2nd level any no concentration, instant, no material, Teleporter spells can be cast as a bonus action.

(all text)

Starting at 2nd level, simple teleportation spells become second nature to you. Teleporter spells that require 1 action to cast, teleport you, are instantaneous, and do not require material components or concentration may be cast as a bonus action. For example, Minor Step, Thunder Step, Dimension Door, Arcane Gate, and Teleport can now be cast with either 1 action or 1 bonus action.

As normal, after casting any spell (even with a bonus action), you can't cast another spell during the same turn, except for a cantrip with a casting time of 1 action.

Reasons for Change(s)
These changes are recommended:
  1. Very minor, but to avoid the rule being applied to spells that already take 1 bonus action to cast (which doesn't make sense), let's be super clear and specify only spells of 1 action can benefit from this feature.
  2. "instant" is more commonly referred to as "instantaneous" in D&D.
  3. "material" is more commonly referred to as "material components" in D&D.
  4. Add some examples! Going through every single spell to see what this applies can be a drag, so let's save everyone time and supply the list up front.

Combative Teleportation[edit]

At 3rd level, you choose a teleportation combat style. Choose between the Warp Slayer, Blurred Brawler, or Plane Manipulator, all detailed at the end of the class description. Your choice grants you features at 3rd Level and again at 6th, 11th, and 17th levels.

Compare Changes 
Before After

At 3rd level, you chose a combative teleportation style. Choose between a devious Warp Slayer, a specialized fighting Blurred Brawler, or to delve deeper into the arcane as a Plane Manipulator, all detailed at the end of the class description. Your choice grants you features at 3rd and again at 6th, 11th, and 17th.

At 3rd level, you choose a combative teleportation style. Choose between the Warp Slayer, Blurred Brawler, or Plane Manipulator, all detailed at the end of the class description. Your choice grants you features at 3rd {{After}level }}and again at 6th, 11th, and 17th levels.

Reasons for Change(s)
Most D&D subclasses do not add flavor to the top introduction, perhaps because they could never properly sum up a subclass. In this case, an argument could be made that all the subclasses are "devious", both melee ones are "specialized fighters", etc. Just this once, I recommend keeping things minimal to be consistent with precedent.

Ability Score Increase[edit]

When you reach 4th level, and again at 8th, 12th, 16th, and 19th level, you can increase one ability score of your choice by 2, or you can increase two ability scores of your choice by 1. As normal, you can't increase an ability score above 20 using this feature.

Compare Changes 
Before After

When you reach 4th level, and again at 8th, 12th, 16th and 19th level, you can increase one ability score of your choice by 2, or you can increase two ability scores of your choice by 1.  As normal, you can't increase an ability score above 20 using this feature.

When you reach 4th level, and again at 8th, 12th, 16th, and 19th level, you can increase one ability score of your choice by 2, or you can increase two ability scores of your choice by 1. As normal, you can't increase an ability score above 20 using this feature.

Reasons for Change(s)
Tiny change to just exactly match what the normal D&D core text says.

Range Extension[edit]

Beginning at 5th level, any teleporter spell with a maximum teleportation distance has that distance doubled. You can also bring along objects when teleporting as long as their weight doesn't exceed what you can carry.

Compare Changes 
Before After

All Teleporter spells distance moved is doubled at 5th level. Non-damaging spells can now also be used on items.

Beginning at 5th level, any teleporter spell with a maximum teleportation distance has that distance doubled. You can also bring along objects when teleporting as long as their weight doesn't exceed what you can carry.

Reasons for Change(s)
There's several ways to interpret or abuse this feature that could be clarified.
"Distance moved" has a couple possible meanings

It may reference the maximum teleportation distance or it may refer to the teleportation distance used when casting (so a person who uses Misty Step to move 5 ft is forced to move 10 ft instead). Clearly the former is the intended effect, but in that case, let's just say what we specifically mean.

"Items" is not defined

D&D has no definition for the word "items". However, it does have a definition for "objects" so let's use that.

No restrictions to objects

The ability to teleport objects where it was previously impossible is a great addition. But there's some problems in the wording:

1. Unclear whether object can be teleported by itself or not.

If it can be teleported by itself, then:

  • Unclear how to apply a spell to an object, for spells that didn't apply anything to the caster in the first place (like demiplane).
  • Unclear what occurs for spells with effects in-between actions or turns (like blink) when objects don't normally take actions or turns.

Given the above complications, I would advise it only applies to objects being brought while a creature teleports.

2. No size or weight restrictions.

A gargantuan stone statue can be moved around just as easily as a tiny pebble. which is pretty abusable. Could be restricted to objects you can carry.

3. No range restrictions.

Is it something you're touching? Something you're bringing with you? Anything you can see? Let's pick an option and write it out.

Unclear what a "non-damaging spell" is

Does it mean a spell that doesn't directly damage others? I presume teleporting a massive stone above a person's head to kill them still counts as a "non-damaging spell"? What if a spell can damage yourself (you can hurt yourself with teleport)?

Given all the above, a player could be justified in spamming minor step to endlessly teleport heavy objects above enemies' heads. From what I can tell, that play style is not the intent of this class.

Most of this can be resolved by just reusing the wording from the dimension door spell: "You can bring along objects as long as their weight doesn't exceed what you can carry."

Space Warping[edit]

At 7th level, when a ranged attack misses you, you can use your reaction to try opening a small portal that sends the projectile back at the attacker. Spend 1 teleport point and make a Dexterity saving throw with the DC equal to the missed attack roll. On a successful save, the creature must succeed on a Dexterity saving throw with disadvantage against your spell save DC or be hit by the attack.

Compare Changes 
Before After

At 7th level when a ranged attack misses you, you may perform a Dex save as a reaction with DC at the missed attack roll. On success spend 1 teleport point to open a small portal that resends the projectile back at the attacker increasing the die rolled by 1 and the creature must make a dex save at disadvantage at your spell save DC.

At 7th level, when a ranged attack misses you, you can use your reaction to try opening a small portal that sends the projectile back at the attacker. Spend 1 teleport point and make a Dexterity saving throw with the DC equal to the missed attack roll. On a successful save, the creature must succeed on a Dexterity saving throw with disadvantage against your spell save DC or be hit by the attack.

Reasons for Change(s)
Mostly just bringing wording and grammar up to D&D standards. With one exception...

Having trouble figuring out what "increasing the die rolled by 1" means (the attack roll? the damage roll? A "die" normally refers to a single individual die... but sometimes both attack rolls and damage rolls involve multiple dice, so what happens then?) Why does this feature need to add a +1, when the enemy already rolls with disadvantage and is highly likely to be hit? Making the Dex save against the attack roll DC is unusual but fun enough, so I'd advise not adding more complexity to a good mechanic.

Friendly Phasing[edit]

Starting at 9th level, when you cast a teleporter spell that normally causes yourself to teleport or vanish, you may cause it to instead affect a different willing creature within 60 feet of you that you can see.

The designated creature is considered the spell caster whenever the spell effect normally refers to you, with the following exceptions:

  • You must still choose the teleportation destination if the spell originally required it.
  • Any line-of-sight or other visual restrictions still apply to you as the caster.
  • Concentration spells still depend on your concentration.
  • Spell effects that depend on an additional action or bonus action still require you to perform the action or bonus action (such as spell dismissal, invoking an extra wiling teleportation jump, etc).
Compare Changes 
Before After

(all text)

The teleporter at 9th level is able to cast any teleportation spells that would mainly move themselves on any willing creature they see within a 60 ft range and decide where they are teleported to based on the effect of the spell.

(all text)

Starting at 9th level, when you cast a teleporter spell that normally causes yourself to teleport or vanish, you may cause it to instead affect a different willing creature within 60 feet of you that you can see.

The designated creature is considered the spell caster whenever the spell effect normally refers to you, with the following exceptions:

  • You must still choose the teleportation destination if the spell originally required it.
  • Any line-of-sight or other visual restrictions still apply to you as the caster.
  • Concentration spells still depend on your concentration.
  • Spell effects that depend on an additional action or bonus action still require you to perform the action or bonus action (such as spell dismissal, invoking an extra wiling teleportation jump, etc).
Reasons for Change(s)
There's a lot of ambiguity about who picks the destination, how line-of-sight works, how concentration works, how actions work, etc. Basically, when retargeting a teleportation spell from one's self to a friend, how much is that friendly responsible for (even though they have no teleportation powers)? Let's make it clear that the friendly gets teleported, but the caster makes all the decision making.

Partial Phasing[edit]

At 10th level, your familiarity with phasing allows you to attempt the incredible and exist in two planes at once. As a bonus action, you may role a DC 17 Charisma saving throw to partially attune with the ethereal plane. On a successful save, you slightly phase out of the material plane and until the end of your next turn, you gain advantage on all saving throws, and attacks against you are made at disadvantage. In addition, healing effects with a range of touch automatically fail, and all other healing effects restore half the number of Hit Points they normally would.

At 14th level, the DC for the the Charisma saving throw becomes 14.

Compare Changes 
Before After

At 10th level at the end of your turn you may role a DC 17 charisma save as a bonus action. On success you slightly phase out of reality. Until the end of your next turn you gain advantage on all saving throws, there is disadvantage to hit you, but you may not be healed by touch, and other healing attempts are half effective. At lvl 14 DC drops to 14.

At 10th level, your familiarity with phasing allows you to attempt the incredible and exist in two planes at once. As a bonus action, you may role a DC 17 Charisma saving throw to partially attune with the ethereal plane. On a successful save, you slightly phase out of the material plane and until the end of your next turn, you gain advantage on all saving throws, and attacks against you are made at disadvantage. In addition, healing effects with a range of touch automatically fail, and all other healing effects restore half the number of Hit Points they normally would.

At 14th level, the DC for the the Charisma saving throw becomes 14.

Reasons for Change(s)
Improved grammar to be more in line with the standards and wording of official D&D materials.

Connected Portals[edit]

Beginning at 13th level, you learn how to pass through walls and other surfaces using portals. While touching a surface, you may cast arcane gate with these changes:

  • The casting costs 7 teleport points instead of its usual spell cost.
  • Instead of choosing two points on the ground that you can see, the first point is the surface you touch and the second point is the other side of that surface. If the other side is not within the spell's range, the spell fails, and the casting is lost.
  • The portal is one-way, initially only permitting creatures to pass from the first point to the second point.
  • As a bonus action, you may expend 2 teleport points to reverse the direction of teleportation.
Compare Changes 
Before After

At 13th level you can touch solid surfaces and using dimension door or similar teleporter spells to open a portal between both sides of the surface as long as the opposite side is within spell range to allow as many creatures as you’d like through the surface. This feature costs 1 extra teleport point per spell. As long as you are in the same spot the door originally opened you can use any Teleporter spell to get back to the other side of the solid surface spending 2 extra teleport points as long as the other side is within spell range.

Beginning at 13th level, you learn how to pass through walls and other surfaces using portals. While touching a surface, you may cast arcane gate with these changes:

* The casting costs 7 teleport points instead of its usual spell cost.

* Instead of choosing two points on the ground that you can see, the first point is the surface you touch and the second point is the other side of that surface. If the other side is not within the spell's range, the spell fails, and the casting is lost.

* The portal is one-way, initially only permitting creatures to pass from the first point to the second point.

* As a bonus action, you may expend 2 teleport points to reverse the direction of teleportation.

Reasons for Change(s)
The original wording is a bit confusing and could leave players with some open questions:
1. How are portals used?

We know that these portals "allow as many creatures as you’d like through the surface", but that's all we know.

From the 5e Class Design Guide:

Don't forget to say how the feature is used. Is it an action, a bonus action, a reaction? Is it triggered on another action, or does it work in a general (non-combat) way?

2. What do the portals look like?

Do they appear like a "hole" where you can see out the other side?

Are they shimmering or misty portals?

Are they invisible?

Does a portal look the same from the front as from behind? Does the destination portal look the same too?

How is a portal oriented... parallel to the touched surface? What if the surface is irregular? Should be the caster be able to orient a portal? How about re-orienting after its been created, and does that take an action?

Or does none of that apply, and portals are attached directly to the touched surface, almost like a "tag"... where touching the marked surface causes the teleportation?

What shape are these portals? What size are they? Does the caster get to decide? If so, what are the limits?

3. What does the spell do?

The feature says "using dimension door or similar teleporter spells to open a portal". But how do you use it?

Are you merely stating that the teleportation effect is *like* dimension door? Or do you actually have to cast the spell (in which case, it consumes teleport points? for dimension door, that would be 6 points + 1 extra... also, does the spell get interrupted or does it technically finish casting)?

You say "or similar teleporter spells" but what does that mean? Any spell that teleports you? Any spell that immediately teleports you? Any spell that does not restrict teleportation destinations to what you can see? What about other portal-like spells?

How does the chosen spell influence the portals? You mention the portals must be "within spell range" which implies the portals are intended to invoke the spell's effect but in a portal-centric way, but this is never actually said. Or is everything about the spell effect ignored, and only the range + spent teleport points matters (in which case, why not restrict it to only supporting dimension door)?

4. How do the teleported get back?

The text "As long as you are in the same spot the door originally opened you can use any Teleporter spell to get back to the other side" is a little confusing.

Since the portal allows "as many creatures as you’d like through the surface", does that mean this is intended to be a one-way portal? And any number of creatures can pass through it, but only you (the person with teleporter spells) can teleport back? Or does invoking the portal in this away also allow any number of creatures to pass back again?

Is the intent that spending 1 point opens a one-way portal, and spending another 2 points makes it two-way? Or does invoking the return trip simply flip the teleportation direction, so now it can only return (in which case, why is it easier to open the initial portal for 1 point but returning through a preexisting portal is harder at 2 points)?

More importantly, this says you "use" a spell to return. Assuming "use" means "cast", would that mean Dimension Door needs to be cast again... but this time for 2 extra points? So to travel to one side costs 7 points, and returning costs 8 points?

5. When do portals end?

With no duration specified, are they intended to be open forever? Or is a portal bound by the duration of the spell "used" to open it?

Can you have multiple portals opened simultaneously? Or does opening one close any previous ones?

Are portals self-sustaining, or do they require caster concentration?


Given current wording, it seems like the intention is to basically replicate arcane gate with these changes:

  • The casting costs 7 teleport points instead of its usual spell cost. (Since you expected Dimension Door to be used, that must mean you expected this to be cast at 4th level, which costs 6 teleport points. Plus the 1 additional to use this feature, that's 7 teleport points total needed).
  • Instead of choosing two points on the ground that you can see, the first point is a surface you touch and the second point is the other side of that surface. The other side must be within the spell's range.
  • The portal is one-way, initially only permitting creatures to pass from the first point to the second point.
  • You may reverse the direction of teleportation of a preexisting portal by expending 8 teleport points.

With my earlier suggestions to change total teleport points, having the return trip be 8 teleport points is too expensive (even if that wasn't the case, no one would ever use this ability, since it's cheaper to open a new portal), so let's reduce it a simple 2 teleport points.


This feature has so many complications, it needs to have its own spell so the rules of spellcasting can simplify all the unknowns. Or, it needs to use an existing spell, but with some tweaks.

I would recommend the latter. Make the intent of this feature clear in the opening sentence, and have the feature just cast a variant of arcane gate.

Tagged Teleport[edit]

At 14th level, you may touch an object and spend 5 teleport points as an action to magically tag it. You can have up to 10 tagged objects at any time. Then as an action costing 5 teleport points, you may teleport that object to you across any distance as long as you and the object are on the same plane and the item's weight doesn't exceed what you can carry. If a creature is holding or wearing the object, they must succeed on a Dexterity saving throw or the object is teleported. After attempting to teleport an object in this way, its tag disappears.

Compare Changes 
Before After

At 14th level you may touch an item and spend 5 teleport points as an action to bind an item to you. You can bind any 10 items to you as long as you can carry it. As an action costing 5 teleport points you may teleport that item to you across any distance as long as you and the item are on the same plane. If the item is in an anti magic field the teleportation fails. If a creature is holding or wearing the item they can make a dex save for a held object and constitution save for a worn object. Failure means the object is teleported After teleporting a new tag is required.

At 14th level, you may touch an object and spend 5 teleport points as an action to magically tag it. You can have up to 10 tagged objects at any time. Then as an action costing 5 teleport points, you may teleport that object to you across any distance as long as you and the object are on the same plane and the item's weight doesn't exceed what you can carry. If a creature is holding or wearing the object, they must succeed on a Dexterity saving throw or the object is teleported. After attempting to teleport an object in this way, its tag disappears.

Reasons for Change(s)
The suggested changes here are minor, but let's dive into the reasons for them...
1. Avoid "Item" and use "Object"

Avoid using the word "item" without a good reason and use "object" instead, as official D&D rules have a written definition of "object" that reduces the chance of abuse (answering questions like "can a house be considered an object?").

2. Avoid handling extreme edge cases

The 5e Class Design Guide suggests this: Don't invest a lot of writing in describing the effects of edge cases that might never crop up. For example, in one class, I saw a big paragraph about what would happen if they cast a spell without using their focus. Such a situation is a rarity. It would be better to keep the effect of that situation simple, so the class isn't cluttered with nonessential information.

Having a sentence on what happens when teleporting an object in an antimagic field is definitely an extremely rare edge case. Almost all teleporter abilities would fail in an antimagic field, and if these instructions aren't needed for any of them, it probably isn't needed here.

3. There are better abilities than Constitution for the saving throw

According to 5e SRD:Constitution, constitution measures health, stamina, and vital force. It appears as a saving throw when the physical body undergoes extreme stress, such as when breathing in a poisonous fume, enduring harsh environments, etc. Weak frail characters will struggle with this throw, while experienced athletes will excel at it.

This ability does not sound relevant for stopping the teleporting of worn objects, because nothing about this feature imposes stress on the body. Why does a buff person get to block this magic easy, but a speedy rogue with sharp reactions and average body toughness doesn't? It would make more sense for the wearer to be tested on their reaction speed to snatch back the object being pulled away, that is, tested with a Dexterity saving throw. So let's just roll this up with the Dex saving throw sentence that's already there.

4. Unlimited retries

The text loosely says that if the teleportation succeeds, a new tag is required. But it does not say what happens if it fails.

If a character tags the crown on a King's head, teleports away to safety, attempts to summon the crown but fails (king passes the saving throw), they can attempt to summon the crown again and again (yes, consuming some teleport points ... which return after a long rest) until finally the king rolls a low number. That seems a bit abusable, so my recommendation is to have the tag disappear after attempting to teleport the tagged object.

Transport Sigils[edit]

By 15th level, you have learned how to use sigil sequences—magical runes arranged in a particular pattern—to create teleportation circles. You gain the sigil circle spell described below.

Sigil Circle
5th-level Conjuration
Casting time: 1 minute
Range: 10 ft.
Components: V M (chalk)
Duration: 1 round
As you cast the spell, you draw a 10-foot-diameter circle on the ground inscribed with sigils that link your location to a permanent teleportation circle of your choice whose sigil sequence you know and that is on the same plane of existence as you. A shimmering portal opens within the circle you drew and remains open until the end of your next turn. Any creature that enters the portal instantly appears within 5 feet of the destination circle or in the nearest unoccupied space if that space is occupied.
You can learn sigil sequences during your adventures. You can commit a new sigil sequence to memory after studying it for 1 minute.
You can create a permanent teleportation circle by casting this spell at 7th level over 1 hour, assigning the circle a unique sigil sequence that you automatically memorize. When you do this, any other permanent circles within 20 miles that were created by you using this spell are nullified as their sigils magically vanish. You can only create a permanent circle in this way once every 10 days, or the spell automatically fails and the spent teleport points remain spent. You need not use the circle to teleport when you cast the spell in this way.
Compare Changes 
Before After

(all text)

At 15th level you are able to easily impart a permanent teleportation sigil at any place easily at a 10 teleport point cost after an 1hour long ritual. No one else can use the sigil unless you give them access. You can only create A sigil at minimum within 20 miles of another this way. If you do it will erase any that are close. You can only use this feature once a week.

(all text)

By 15th level, you have learned how to use sigil sequences—magical runes arranged in a particular pattern—to create teleportation circles. You gain the sigil circle spell described below.

[​| style\="margin-left: 40px"

​|-

​| [[5e Spell

​|name=Sigil Circle

​|school=Conjuration

​|ritual=

​|lvl=5th

​|casttime=1 minute

​|range=10 ft.

​|comp=V M (chalk)

​|dur=1 round

​|summary=Variant of the teleportation circle spell

]]

​|-

​| As you cast the spell, you draw a 10-foot-diameter circle on the ground inscribed with sigils that link your location to a permanent teleportation circle of your choice whose sigil sequence you know and that is on the same plane of existence as you. A shimmering portal opens within the circle you drew and remains open until the end of your next turn. Any creature that enters the portal instantly appears within 5 feet of the destination circle or in the nearest unoccupied space if that space is occupied.

​|-

​| You can learn sigil sequences during your adventures. You can commit a new sigil sequence to memory after studying it for 1 minute.

​|-

​| You can create a permanent teleportation circle by casting this spell at 7th level over 1 hour, assigning the circle a unique sigil sequence that you automatically memorize. When you do this, any other permanent circles within 20 miles that were created by you using this spell are nullified as their sigils magically vanish. You can only create a permanent circle in this way once every 10 days, or the spell automatically fails and the spent teleport points remain spent. You need not use the circle to teleport when you cast the spell in this way.

​|]

Reasons for Change(s)
There are several major unanswered questions about this feature.
What is a "sigil"?

From the teleporation circle spell, we have the line "a unique sigil sequence - a string of magical runes arranged in a particular pattern". So in this feature, is a sigil a magical rune? Let's be sure to describe it.

Are there really no restrictions with imparting sigils "at any place easily"?

This wording is too open-ended. Since it doesn't explain *how* to impart a sigil, it sounds like it just happens "by magic" with no range or other limits (do you even have to see where you're placing it? just imagine a place, and it's tagged?).

What does the sigil do?

The feature text literally doesn't say.


I am going to presume this is intended to mimic teleportation circle, with some heavy modifications. Based on that thinking, I would suggest a few tweaks...

1. It should be written as a spell

Considering teleportation circle is already fairly complicated for a spell, and we're not removing complications but just changing them, its replacement should also be a spell. It will really benefit from having the framework of the spellcasting rules.

2. Remove "No one else can use the sigil unless you give them access."

It will be quite uncommon for anyone to discover a teleporter's sigil destination. Even if they stumble on one in the heat of battle, teleportation circle says that normally sigils take a full minute to memorize anyway. I don't see why this scenario needs to be treated as a risk that needs to be actively avoided, as if it can be easily abused. But on the chance the player stumbles on another teleporter's sigil, why should it be impossible for them to teleport there themselves? I can't think of a logical or canonical reason for that.

Let's avoid adding even more complications to a complex feature.

3. The feature should describe what it does

The feature describes how to set up a sigil, but has no instructions on what it does or how it's used. Let's describe it better.

Weave Manipulator[edit]

By 18th level, your extensive knowledge in manipulating the fabric of space now allows you to explore manipulating the weave itself. You gain access to the spells antimagic field, astral projection, banishment, imprisonment, reality break, and time stop.

Compare Changes 
Before After

(all text)

\=\=\=\= Reality Manipulator \=\=\=\=

At 18th level the Teleporter gains access to the spells of Wish, Time Stop, control weather, imprisonment and Mordenkainen’s magnificent manor and any other

(all text)

\=\=\=\= Weave Manipulator \=\=\=\=

By 18th level, your extensive knowledge in manipulating the fabric of space now allows you to explore manipulating the weave itself. You gain access to the spells antimagic field, astral projection, banishment, imprisonment, reality break, and time stop.

Reasons for Change(s)
Bestowing godlike powers sounds like the ideal endgame of any RPG... or maybe the ultimate destination of a character breaking the laws of physics... but it's still important to ask: where does this class stand compared to others at the same level? and what's unique about *this* class that others don't have?

Granting a class all da powers always sounds like a fun implementation at first, but once you factor in how it affects the rest of game as a whole, there's not a lot going for it. Sorcerers and Wizards, the core casters that don't really specialize in anything EXCEPT for their vast magical knowledge and access to rare spells (like Wish)... are now in competition with Teleporter, who went from a specialist caster to someone that can summon mansions, control the weather, grant wishes, and more, while being completely untouchable. Why would anyone want to pick a wizard now?

More importantly, the selection of spells doesn't follow a theme. This feature is called "reality manipulator" but their skills have never been for bending reality to their will, but of bending metamagic to their will. New spells should follow that theme. It makes more sense for a Teleporter to study astral projection rather than how to control clouds. Following a theme consistent with their other powers will make the class more memorable rather than devolving it into yet another homebrew Super Sorcerer.

Spatial Transmission[edit]

At 20th level, you gain the ability to teleport entire regions of space. As an action, you may spend 7 teleport points to invisibly tag a cube of space up to 20 feet large (the tag never expires and only one such tag may exist at a time). When a region is tagged in this way, then as an action, you may spend 11 teleport points to teleport the tagged space and all its contents to any point in space you are touching in any desired orientation. When this happens, the tag is consumed and each creature or object that was present within the destination space takes 3d10 force damage and is forcibly ejected from the cube to the nearest unoccupied space.

Compare Changes 
Before After

At 20th level the teleporter can tag a point in space for 7 teleport points. They can only have one tag exist in this fashion at a time. This allows the teleporter to decide a space up to a 20 foot cube. The point can be the corner, a side, or the center of a face. Then at any point they can teleport that space as an action to another point in space they touch at the cost of 11 teleport points. Once it arrives anything within the space reacts to being in this new space as it would normally and the tag is lost.

At 20th level, you gain the ability to teleport entire regions of space. As an action, you may spend 7 teleport points to invisibly tag a cube of space up to 20 feet large (the tag never expires and only one such tag may exist at a time). When a region is tagged in this way, then as an action, you may spend 11 teleport points to teleport the tagged space and all its contents to any point in space you are touching in any desired orientation. When this happens, the tag is consumed and each creature or object that was present within the destination space takes 3d10 force damage and is forcibly ejected from the cube to the nearest unoccupied space.

Reasons for Change(s)
Made some grammatical and wording tweaks to bring this up to par with other D&D text. The idea itself is great, but I recommend 2 changes:

1. Say what happens if something already exists in the destination space

This will be a common scenario. Easiest way to resolve that is to copy the behavior from the teleport spell and inflict force damage.

2. Remove the line "The point can be the corner, a side, or the center of a face"

I can't see a reason to restrict tagging to the outside of a cube. Of all the features that need more specificity, I'm not sure this one benefits from it, so I would recommend removing the superfluous mechanic.

Combative Teleportation[edit]

Teleporters have an uncanny knack for battlefield control through spatial manipulation and attacks. While each teleporter hones these skills and abilities in their own way, most teleporters end up adopting one of three combat styles: Warp Slayer, Blurred Brawler, or Plane Manipulator.

Compare Changes 
Before After

Teleporters have an uncanny type of strength in controlling the course of a battle through spatial manipulation and attacks. Each teleporter hones these skills and abilities in different ways developing different kinds of combative teleportation. This defines their attempt to master their newfound powers and the answers they’ve discovered in needs for protection.

Teleporters have an uncanny knack for battlefield control through spatial manipulation and attacks. While each teleporter hones these skills and abilities in their own way, most teleporters end up adopting one of three combat styles: Warp Slayer, Blurred Brawler, or Plane Manipulator.

Reasons for Change(s)
Reworded for smoother reading. Also, instead of introducing a section of 3 combat styles by discussing how each teleporter invents their own style (with no reference to the 3), let's focus on how most teleporters connect with the 3 styles being introduced.

Warp Slayer[edit]

The best defense is to kill from behind.
Motto of the Warp Slayer

This combat style uses disappearing acts to take advantage of the enemy from behind and strike decisively.

Compare Changes 
Before After

The best defense is to kill them from behind is the motto of the warp slayer using their disappearing acts to take advantage of the enemy from behind they decided striking decisively.

__quote

|The best defense is to kill from behind.

|size_90px

|orig_Motto of the Warp Slayer__

This combat style uses disappearing acts to take advantage of the enemy from behind and strike decisively.

Reasons for Change(s)
Having a "motto" is a fun way to introduce the subclasses. Let's take advantage of this principal and use the Quote template. Also, fixed some grammar.

Warp Strike[edit]

When you choose this combat style at 3rd level, you can inflict extra damage on melee attacks following a warp. Whenever you teleport within 5 feet of a creature and attack it, they may roll a Wisdom saving throw to see if they know your new location. If you have not attacked this target in the last 1 minute, the DC is equal to your first strike save DC (10 + your Proficiency Bonus + your Charisma modifier); otherwise, the DC is equal to your primary strike save DC (8 + (your Proficiency Bonus / 2) + your Charisma modifier) as the target has adapted to your warp strikes. On a failed save, you make the attack with advantage. In addition, if the target failed their save, you succeeded on your save, and the DC was equal to the first strike save DC, you may add your Warp Strike Die bonus from the Extra Warp Strike Damage table to the attack’s damage roll.

Compare Changes 
Before After

(all text)

At level 3 the Teleporter warps close to an enemy they must roll a Wisdom save to see if they realize where the Warp Slayer is against 10+prof +charisma modifier. If the enemy fails the next attack the Warp Slayer makes against the enemy is at advantage and on successful attack they roll an extra damage die based on the warp strike die bonus. After the first successful attack this way against an enemy out of surprise rounds they learn and instead of the previous DC they roll against 8+1/2prof+charisma modifier showing that they have adapted to the Warp slayers tactics. Warp strike cannot work on a creature that has made an attack against you directly in the past turn as they are fully focused on you. Spells that were not centered on the Warp Slayer do not count as full focus.

(all text)

When you choose this combat style at 3rd level, you can inflict extra damage on melee attacks following a warp. Whenever you teleport within 5 feet of a creature and attack it, they must roll a Wisdom saving throw to see if they know your new location. If you have not attacked this target in the last 1 minute, the DC is equal to your first strike save DC (10 + your Proficiency Bonus + your Charisma modifier); otherwise, the DC is equal to your primary strike save DC (8 + (your Proficiency Bonus / 2) + your Charisma modifier) as the target has adapted to your warp strikes. On a failed save, you make the attack with advantage. In addition, if the target failed their save, you succeeded on your save, and the DC was equal to the first strike save DC, you may add your Warp Strike Die bonus from the Extra Warp Strike Damage table to the attack’s damage roll.

Reasons for Change(s)
Let's breakdown the changes one at a time.
1. Proper subclass introduction

Not strictly necessary, but the majority of D&D subclasses start with "When you choose this [subclass]", followed by a general overview of what's special about this class. Let's follow the precedent.

2. Reorder for clarity

There is a *lot* of steps to this feature, and a couple of them are listed out-of-order at the end. Specifically, the "but if the enemy attacked you already, take it all back, you couldn't have warp striked... unless it was a non-centered spell, then it does..." text. I recommend reordering it to be perfectly sequential and easy to follow.

3. Give common DCs their own names

Just as we have a documented Spell Save DC, as it has to be referenced tons of times in combat, there should be dedicated names for the two Warp Strike DCs you have. "First Strike Save DC" and "Primary Strike Save DC" (I recommend "primary" as it is the DC they'll require more than anything - plus I want it to sound like a positive feature) seemed to fit the descriptions.

3. No range given in range requirements

This feature activates when the player "warps close" but it's not stated how close that needs to be. I will assume it's 5 feet (like most combat-centric actions), in which case, let's replace "warps close" with "teleport within 5 feet".

4. Avoid referencing an "enemy"

While creatures can be "enemies", there are many combat situations where the opponent may not be considered an enemy. Similar to how the 5e Class Design Guide warns against targeting "hostile" creatures. Does the party member that stole your chicken leg get officially categorized as "an enemy" when I'm attempting an unarmed nonlethal warp strike back at them, even if they're definitely non-hostile and very friendly? Either reference the creature you're attacking, or focus on the attack action itself (I recommend the latter).

5. Avoid referencing the length of an "encounter"

The 5e Class Design Guide specifically calls this out as a bad practice, as "encounter" is not officially defined. Use a specific length of time, like "in the last 1 minute" instead.

6. Avoid referencing "surprise rounds"

The reference to "surprise rounds" is inaccurate. D&D core rules do not have surprise rounds... they have the surprised pseudo-condition (since some characters can be surprised, others might not be, depending on the situation) and even then, it only affects the first turn at the start of a battle. Yet a first strike may not be in the 1st round (you might kill 1 target, then deal a first strike against a new one, well after the 1st round is done). It sounds like your intention is just for the first attack to have a high DC, while subsequent ones are lower as they've adapted, so let's be clear about that and avoid the word "surprise".

7. First-strike wording is too open-ended

With the wording "After the first successful attack... an enemy... [has] adapted to the Warp slayers tactics", a target who is not killed can never be surprised by teleportation ever again, ever. This doesn't seem thematically likely, so let's restrict it to "If you have not attacked this target in the last 1 minute" instead.

Extra Warp Strike Damage
Teleporter Level Warp Strike Die
Level 3 2d6
Level 4 2d6
Level 5 3d6
Level 6 3d6
Level 7 4d6
Level 8 4d6
Level 9 5d6
Level 10 5d6
Level 11 6d6
Level 12 6d6
Level 13 7d6
Level 14 7d6
Level 15 8d6
Level 16 8d6
Level 17 9d6
Level 18 9d6
Level 19 10d6
Level 20 10d6
First strike save DC = 10 + your Proficiency Bonus + your Charisma modifier
Primary strike save DC = 8 + (your Proficiency Bonus / 2) + your Charisma modifier
Stun save DC = 8 + your Proficiency Bonus + your Dexterity modifier

Stunning Strike[edit]

Beginning at 6th level, you learn how to strike an opponent’s body to cause maximum pain. Whenever you hit another creature with a Warp Strike and they fail the saving throw, you can attempt to stun them. The target must succeed on Constitution saving throw against your stun save DC (8 + your Proficiency bonus + your Dexterity modifier) or be stunned. The stunned target can be reattempt the saving throw with advantage at the start of each of its turns, and on a successful save, the stunning effect ends.

Compare Changes 
Before After

____anc:Advantageous Warp__

At level 6 if the enemy that has adapted to the warp strike fails the save, the Warp slayer’s successful attack on the creature they also force the creature to make an 8+prof+Dex modifier DC constitution save or be stunned until they make the save on one of their turns. The creature gains advantage on this roll after the first stunned turn.

____ Stunning Strike ____

Beginning at 6th level, you learn how to strike an opponent’s body to cause maximum pain. Whenever you hit another creature with a Warp Strike and they fail the saving throw, you can attempt to stun them. The target must succeed on Constitution saving throw against your stun save DC (8 + your Proficiency bonus + your Dexterity modifier) or be stunned. The stunned target can be reattempt the saving throw with advantage at the start of each of its turns, and on a successful save, the stunning effect ends.

Reasons for Change(s)
This is mostly general grammar and wording tweaks to more closely resemble other D&D features. The two notable changes are:

1. Renamed "Advantageous Warp" to "Stunning Strike". Since nothing about this feature grants the teleporter advantage, I'd recommend not calling it "advantageous". It's a lot more related to "warp strike" than anything, so "stunning strike" seems fitting and specific to its effect.

2. Clarify when the saving throw is rolled after the first one, as it's unclear if it should happen at the start of their turn or at the end (I recommend at the start of each of the target's turns; otherwise, it feels a little unfair).

Warp Out[edit]

By level 11, you gain the ability to warp away after an attack. After you hit another creature with a Warp Strike, then as part of the attack action, you can teleport up to 30 feet to an unoccupied space that you can see.

Compare Changes 
Before After

At level 11 the warp slayer has the ability to warp away after it makes its successful warp strike as part of the action up to 30ft in any direction.

By level 11, you gain the ability to warp away after an attack. After you hit another creature with a Warp Strike, then as part of the attack action, you can teleport up to 30 feet to an unoccupied space that you can see.

Reasons for Change(s)
Rewording to be consistent with standard D&D wording and grammar.

Killing Warp[edit]

At level 17, when you hit a creature with Warp Strike and that creature has a condition, your attack deals double the damage (including critical damage).

Compare Changes 
Before After

The warp slayer at level 17 when warp striking any creature with an impairing condition deals double the damage (including critical damage).

At level 17, when you hit a creature with Warp Strike and that creature has a condition, your attack deals double the damage (including critical damage).

Reasons for Change(s)
Rewording to be consistent with D&D wording and grammar.

Blurred Brawler[edit]

The best defense is to not even be there.
Motto of the Blurred Brawler

Skilled in physical battle and augmented by their teleportation skills, users of this combat style dominate their opponents.

Compare Changes 
Before After

The best defense is to not be there is the motto of the teleporter who has decided to become a Blurred Brawler. Becoming skilled in physical battle augmented by their teleportation skills they dominate opponents.

__quote

|The best defense is to not even be there.

|size_90px

|orig_Motto of the Blurred Brawler__

Skilled in physical battle and augmented by their teleportation skills, users of this combat style dominate their opponents.

Reasons for Change(s)
Same reasons for recommending the revised Warp Slayer introduction.

Blurred Battle[edit]

Starting when you choose this style at 3rd level, you can add your Charisma modifier to your AC, Dexterity score, and Proficiency bonus while wearing no armor.

Also, when you take the dodge action, you may spend 2 teleport points to add +1 to your AC. This may be done up to two times after you finish a long rest.

Beginning at 5th level, you can attack twice, instead of once, whenever you take the attack action on your turn.

Compare Changes 
Before After

The blurred brawler now can add their charisma modifier to their AC as well as Dex and proficiency while wearing no armor. Along with this they become able to spend 2 teleport points to gain +1 to AC until next turn if they take the dodge action and this can be done twice. Along with this at 5th level the Brawler gains an extra attack.

Starting when you choose this style at 3rd level, you can add your Charisma modifier to your AC, Dexterity score, and Proficiency bonus while wearing no armor.

Also, when you take the dodge action, you may spend 2 teleport points to add +1 to your AC. This may be done up to two times after you finish a long rest.

Beginning at 5th level, you can attack twice, instead of once, whenever you take the attack action on your turn.

Reasons for Change(s)
Expanded wording to resemble D&D language a little more. Only notable change is that the +1 AC feature can now only used twice after finishing a long rest, as opposed to the original wording that was so broad that the feature could only be used twice for the character's entire lifespan.

Spatial Weapons[edit]

At level 6, you can spend 4 teleport points to make your weapons deal force damage for 1 minute. For this duration, you also gain the following benefits:

  • You may spend another 2 teleport points to add an extra d6 of force damage to your next attack. This can only be done once for the duration.
  • You may spend another 3 teleport points to add +1 to the attack roll of your next attack. This effect can stack twice before an attack roll is made.
Compare Changes 
Before After

At level 6 the blurred brawler can use 4 teleport points to make the damage dealt by your weapons deal force damage for the next minute. When you make the attack action while the previous effect is active you can spend another 2 teleport points to add an extra d6 of damage for the attack, but only once. Also while the force weapons are active you may spend 3 teleport points to adds +1 to the attack roll, this effect stacks twice but at least one effect must be done before the attack roll.

At level 6, you can spend 4 teleport points to make your weapons deal force damage for 1 minute. For this duration, you also gain the following benefits:

  • You may spend another 2 teleport points to add an extra d6 of force damage to your next attack. This can only be done once for the duration.
  • You may spend another 3 teleport points to add +1 to the attack roll of your next attack. This effect can stack twice before an attack roll is made.
Reasons for Change(s)
Simplified some wording (for example, "When you make the attack action while the previous effect is active...to add an extra d6 of damage for the attack" can be changed to "You may...add an extra d6 of force damage to your next attack"), plus clarified some grammar and word choices to match D&D standards.

Blurred Entry[edit]

Your blurred combat style becomes second nature to you. At level 11, after teleporting any distance until the end of your next turn, you have advantage on Dexterity (Stealth) checks and teleport point costs for Blurred Battle and Spatial Weapons are halved (rounded up).

Compare Changes 
Before After

The blurred brawler is even more out of plane after teleporting than usual teleporters at level 11. This causes them to be harder to notice and eases the use of the abilities they’ve mastered. After teleporting any distance they gain advantage on stealth checks and half the cost of teleport points (rounded up) for Blurred Battle and Spatial Weapons.

Your blurred combat style becomes second nature to you. At level 11, after teleporting any distance until the end of your next turn, you have advantage on Dexterity (Stealth) checks and teleport point costs for Blurred Battle and Spatial Weapons are halved (rounded up).

Reasons for Change(s)
Comparing this teleporter against the "usual" teleporter is very odd, I'm not entirely sure what a "usual" teleporter is. At this point, the Warp Slayer can teleport away after every strike (assuming their crazy stunning strike failed), and the Plane Manipulator is redirecting fireballs, teleporting his enemies into volcanos, and just stole 3 spells from other classes... but you're saying that this subclass is crazier than all of them because it has advantage on Stealth and made a couple powers 1 point cheaper? Eh... maybe just say their blurred combat style has become second nature to them.

Blurred Reality[edit]

By level 17, you can shift so far out of the current plane that sometimes your movement creates an afterimage that materializes as a solid double. As part of any action, you may attempt this by spending 14 teleport points and making a DC 23 Charisma saving throw. On a successful save, you force this double to materialize and attempt the same action and bonus actions you take on this turn.

Compare Changes 
Before After

____anc:Doubled Blur__

At level 17 the Blurred Brawler is so out of phase with the plane they are on that sometimes the movements they take have a solid double. For each action they take they may ask to pay 14 teleport points to perform a DC 23 charisma save. On success they may roll to have their out of phase duplicate also attempt the action. If a bonus action results from the action (for example a two weapon fighting attack) the bonus action is included on the save.

____ Blurred Reality ____

By level 17, you can shift so far out of the current plane that sometimes your movement creates an afterimage that materializes as a solid double. As part of any action, you may attempt this by spending 14 teleport points and making a DC 23 Charisma saving throw. On a successful save, you force this double to materialize and attempt the same action and bonus actions you take on this turn.

Reasons for Change(s)
Reworded for clarity and quality. Also, renamed section from "Doubled Blur" to "Blurred Reality" for dramatic effect.

Plane Manipulator[edit]

The best defense is get rid of the offense.
Motto of the Plane Manipulator

Delving into magical research, users of this style gain access to conventional spells and learn advanced techniques to impose their spatial will on others.

Compare Changes 
Before After

The best defense is to get rid of the offense is the motto of the Plane Manipulator. Delving deeper into their arcane powers they discover the ability to further use magic as a caster they unlock their ability to use other magics in a conventional way as well as to impose their spatial will on others.<!-Introduce this subclass here->

__quote

|The best defense is get rid of the offense.

size_90px

|orig_Motto of the Plane Manipulator

__

Delving into magical research, users of this style gain access to conventional spells and learn advanced techniques to impose their spatial will on others.

Reasons for Change(s)
Same reasons for recommending the revised Warp Slayer introduction.
Spellcasting

Starting when you choose this style at 3rd level, your arcane research and innate magical skills give you an aptitude for sorcerery. You gain access to the sorcerer spell list and cast sorcerer spells using the general rules of spellcasting instead of Shifted In The Planes.

Compare Changes 
Before After

You have learned to cast spells as others do requiring an arcane focus, you have access to the Sorcerer spell list but can only cast these spells using spell slots, not your teleport points. You cast using the spell table below and use the Shifted in the Planes spell modifier and spell save.

Starting when you choose this style at 3rd level, your arcane research and innate magical skills give you an aptitude for sorcerery. You gain access to the sorcerer spell list and cast sorcerer spells using the general rules of spellcasting instead of Shifted In The Planes.

Reasons for Change(s)
Added the usual subclass flavor text, with general rewording for clarity. No need to mention the arcane focus since it can get its own section, to be consistent with other spellcasting sections.
Teleporter Level Cantrips Spells Known 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th
3rd 2 3 3 - - - -
4th 2 4 3 - - - -
5th 2 4 4 2 - - -
6th 2 4 4 3 - - -
7th 2 5 4 3 2 - -
8th 2 6 4 3 2 - -
9th 2 6 4 3 2 - -
10th 3 7 4 3 2 - -
11th 3 8 4 3 3 1 -
12th 3 8 4 3 3 1 -
13th 3 9 4 3 3 1 -
14th 3 10 4 3 3 2 1
15th 3 10 4 3 3 2 1
16th 3 11 4 3 3 2 1
17th 3 11 4 3 3 2 2
18th 3 11 4 3 3 2 2
19th 3 12 4 3 3 2 2
20th 3 13 4 3 3 2 2
Cantrips

At 1st level, you know two cantrips of your choice from the sorcerer spell list. You learn additional sorcerer cantrips of your choice at higher levels, as shown in the Cantrips Known column of the Spellcasting table.

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Before After

At 1st level, you know two cantrips of your choice from the sorcerer spell list. You learn additional sorcerer cantrips of your choice at higher levels, as shown in the Cantrips Known column of the Spellcasting table.

Reasons for Change(s)
Spellcasting tables are usually accompanied by explanations for what the columns even means. It's unfair to assume that everyone will look at the Sorcerer class and fill in whatever's missing from here with there. Better to just clearly explain the appropriate rules. These and the next few spellcasting subfeatures are copied straight from the Sorcerer class.
Spell Slots

The Spellcasting table shows how many spell slots you have to cast your sorcerer spells of 1st level and higher. To cast one of these sorcerer spells, you must expend a slot of the spell’s level or higher. You regain all expended spell slots when you finish a long rest.

For example, if you know the 1st-level spell burning hands and have a 1st-level and a 2nd-level spell slot available, you can cast burning hands using either slot.

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Before After

The Spellcasting table shows how many spell slots you have to cast your sorcerer spells of 1st level and higher. To cast one of these sorcerer spells, you must expend a slot of the spell’s level or higher. You regain all expended spell slots when you finish a long rest.

For example, if you know the 1st-level spell burning hands and have a 1st-level and a 2nd-level spell slot available, you can cast burning hands using either slot.

Reasons for Change(s)
Copied from the Sorcerer class.
Spells Known of 1st Level and Higher

You know three 1st-level spells of your choice from the sorcerer spell list.

The Spells Known column of the Spellcaster table shows when you learn more sorcerer spells of your choice. Each of these spells must be of a level for which you have spell slots. For instance, when you reach 3rd level in this class, you can learn one new spell of 1st or 2nd level.

Additionally, when you gain a level in this class, you can choose one of the sorcerer spells you know and replace it with another spell from the sorcerer spell list, which also must be of a level for which you have spell slots.

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_Spells Known of 1st Level and Higher

You know three 1st-level spells of your choice from the sorcerer spell list.

The Spells Known column of the Spellcaster table shows when you learn more sorcerer spells of your choice. Each of these spells must be of a level for which you have spell slots. For instance, when you reach 3rd level in this class, you can learn one new spell of 1st or 2nd level.

Additionally, when you gain a level in this class, you can choose one of the sorcerer spells you know and replace it with another spell from the sorcerer spell list, which also must be of a level for which you have spell slots.

Reasons for Change(s)
Copied from the Sorcerer class.
Spellcasting Ability

You use the same Spellcasting Abilty rules from Shifted In The Planes when you cast a sorcerer spell, including using your Charisma for your spellcasting ability, saving throw DC, and when making an attack roll.

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Before After

You use the same Spellcasting Abilty rules from Shifted In The Planes when you cast a sorcerer spell, including using your Charisma for your spellcasting ability, saving throw DC, and when making an attack roll.

Reasons for Change(s)
Copied from the Sorcerer class.
Spellcasting Focus

You can use an arcane focus as a spellcasting focus for your sorcerer spells.

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You can use an arcane focus as a spellcasting focus for your sorcerer spells.

Reasons for Change(s)
Copied from the Sorcerer class.

Plane Step[edit]

When you reach 3rd level, you've become so accustomed to walking between the planes that taking "just another step" becomes second nature to you. When you cast a spell of 1st level or higher that costs teleporter points, you may cast misty step as a bonus action at no cost.

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At 3rd level when the Plane Walker casts a 1st level or greater spell in this manner arcane energies allow you to cast misty step as a bonus action at no cost.

When you reach 3rd level, you've become so accustomed to walking between the planes that taking "just another step" becomes second nature to you. When you cast a spell of 1st level or higher that costs teleporter points, you may cast misty step as a bonus action at no cost.

Reasons for Change(s)
Besides the usual flavor text/grammar suggestions, restricting this feature to spells that cost teleport points is important.

At this level, the Plane Manipulator can cast 8 sorcerer spells per day and 2 teleporter spells per day. It's a little ambiguous in the wording whether this bonus misty step could be cast after all spells, after only sorcerer spells, or after only teleporter spells... or doing the math, whether they should get 10/day, 8/day, or 2/day. Considering this is a mere Level 3, meant to give a taste of the future, and they already have powerful cantrips + tons of sorcery, I would recommend this feature be restricted to only teleporter spells for 2/day. The jump from 2 possible teleportations a day to double that will already feel huge to them.

Shearing the Plane[edit]

By 7th level, your warping instincts are so honed that you can instinctively deflect magic about to harm you. You learn the the redirect magic spell described below.

Redirect Magic
3rd-level Abjuration
Casting time: 1 reaction
Range: 60 ft. (cannot be affected by Range Extension)
Components: S
Duration: Instantaneous
You attempt to redirect a spell that would immediately damage you. Make a Charisma saving throw. The DC equals 15 + double the spell's level.
You can spend additional teleportation points and add the number of extra points spent to the saving throw roll; you can wait until after rolling the saving throw before deciding to do this, but must decide before the DM says whether the roll succeeds or fails.
On a successful save, you redirect the spell to target a different creature or point (as appropriate to the spell) that you can see within range, causing the same effect but dealing only half the damage as force damage (i.e, Fireball would have the same DC, same range, but deals 8d6/2 force damage on a failed save), then the spell ends. On a failed save, nothing happens and all spent teleport points remain spent.
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Before After

You can redirect the effects of space and the arcane. At 6th level as a reaction to a magical effect that causes damage (Ex. Firebolt, Fireball) you can pay 5 or more teleport points to roll off against the caster’s spell attack modifier with your own. On success you redirect the spell to center on the caster causing the effect but dealing only half the damage as force damage (fireball would have the same DC, same range, but deals 4d6 force damage on failed save). If the counter action is not of high enough spell level then the Plane Manipulator must roll a DC 15+2 per extra spell level charisma save to attempt to make the counter work. As an action this effect can be used to shear the space of an area casting shatter but pulling creatures towards the centered points. It casts as a 3rd level spell at 5 teleport points and increases range by 5feet for each spell level as well as normal damage.

By 7th level, your warping instincts are so honed that you can instinctively deflect magic about to harm you. You learn the the redirect magic spell described below.

_| style_"margin-left: 40px"

|-

| __5e Spell

|name_Redirect Magic

|school_Abjuration

|ritual_

|lvl_3rd

|casttime_1 reaction

|range_60 ft. (cannot be affected by Range Extension)

|comp_S

|dur_Instantaneous

|summary_Redirect a spell that would damage you

__

|-

| You attempt to redirect a spell that would immediately damage you. Make a Charisma saving throw. The DC equals 15 + double the spell's level.

|-

| You can spend additional teleportation points and add the number of extra points spent to the saving throw roll; you can wait until after rolling the saving throw before deciding to do this, but must decide before the DM says whether the roll succeeds or fails.

|-

| On a successful save, you redirect the spell to target a different creature or point (as appropriate to the spell) that you can see within range, causing the same effect but dealing only half the damage as force damage (i.e, Fireball would have the same DC, same range, but deals 8d6/2 force damage on a failed save), then the spell ends. On a failed save, nothing happens and all spent teleport points remain spent.

|_

Reasons for Change(s)
Why does he write essays? Is he some monster sent here to torment me? I swear, that's exactly what I am... now let's take a look at this class feature and why I feel simplifying the mechanics a bit and arranging it into spell format will make playing it a more fun experience.

The ability to counter any damaging spell in the game is significant, and the wording must be airtight or the potential to become invulernable is enormous. Let's break it down:

"...as a reaction to a magical effect that causes damage (Ex. Firebolt, Fireball)"

D&D has no definition of the phrase "magical effect". For example, when an opponent magically transforms a stick on the ground into a sword that they use to strike you with slashing damage, were you damaged by a "magic effect"? It's unclear, so let's just be specific on what this should be countering (going by your example): spells.

"you can pay 5 or more teleport points to roll off against the caster’s spell attack modifier with your own."

"Rolling off against [roll] with your own [roll]" is what D&D normally calls a "contested ability check". Two characters arm-wrestling would make contested Strength checks, for example. But you aren't asking for an ability check... not even a contested Spellcasting Ability check. The requirement is that the spell attack modifier be used... so a contested spell attack? It is unprecedented in the D&D world, and although that is fine, it's good to consider whether a more reliable precedented approach exists first.

For example, dispel magic and counterspell have similar abilities but base their difficult on the opposing spell's level... not the opposing caster's abilities. They would normally have difficulty countering a 9th-level meteor storm, for example. But back to this feature... well, meteor storm doesn't even use attack rolls (it just hits and does half or full damage) so I'm not sure a contested attack roll to redirect it even make sense.

But more importantly, using contested spell attack rolls means you can spend a 3rd-level spell worth of points to easily counter 9th-level spells if the casters have poor stats in the spell attack modifier. Is that actually fair? Frankly, it's debatable, but unless you've done a lot of playtesting and number crunching to prove it's fun, it seems just a bit unfair and only adds new complexity.

"On success you redirect the spell to center on the caster causing the effect"

150 years ago, a Lich left a magic trap - a simple glyph of warding that casts fireball if someone besides him tries to enter his old tomb. When a teleporter triggers the trap, then with the above rule, they have a chance of redirecting the fireball onto his corpse in a museum on the other side of the world right now. As funny as that sounds, the wording is probably too open-ended if this is possible.

"but dealing only half the damage as force damage (fireball would have the same DC, same range, but deals 4d6 force damage on failed save)."

The first half said it deals half damage, but the second-half's example shows it dealing half the normal number of damage dice. Since I don't even know how to halve the dice of a 5d4 damage roll (2.5d4?), I would suggest sticking with the half damage formula.

"If the counter action is not of high enough spell level"

Wait, so this is about spell level? We've abandoned any dependence on the spell attack modifier, instead focusing on the incoming spell's level? While I applaud the change to resemble dispel magic / counterspell more (for the reasons mentioned earlier), now I really have no idea what roll this feature wants or what it will do.

"then the Plane Manipulator must roll a DC 15+2 per extra spell level charisma save to attempt to make the counter work."

The DC is critical for this feature, such that even changing it by 1 in any direction has huge implications on how the power works. So let's double-check the math. To determine a good DC, we need to first establish the minimum/maximum boundaries we want. What are the extremes? While I don't know the original intentions, these extremes come to mind first: 1. It should be "Very Easy" to "Easy" for a Level 7 character to block a cantrip for free (without spending additional teleport points). 2. It should be "Hard" for a Level 20 character to block a 9th-level spell for free (without spending additional teleport points).

This can be directly translated to "What d20 roll would simulate this difficulty?" It's skewing the original intention slightly, but using the Typical Difficulty Classes table, we can get some practical numbers for this: 1. Very Easy to Easy: a natural roll of 5-10 2. Hard: a natural roll of 20

The final number needs to be offset by the "average" Charisma saving throw bonus. This isn't really the intended use of the Typical Difficulty Classes table, but Teleporters have such strong Charisma saving throws, this must be accounted for or opposing magic will cease to be dangerous altogether.

But what is an "average" save bonus? Assuming "reasonable" ability scores at character creation (Charisma 14), and that they increase their Charisma by 2 with each ASI level up, the average Level 7 character has a Chr saving throw of +6, and the average Level 20 character has a Chr saving throw of +11.

With a DC of 15 + (2 × spell level), a bit of nerdy math (if you want the full spreadsheet and explanation on how this is calculated, just let me know!) tells us this story:

  1. A Level 7 needs to roll 9 or better to block a cantrip for free
  2. A Level 20 needs to roll a natural 20 to block an 8th-level spell for free, and they cannot block 9th-level spells for free

With a DC of 13 + (2 × spell level), the math instead tells this story:

  1. A Level 7 needs to roll 7 or better to block a cantrip
  2. A Level 20 needs to roll 20 to block a 9th-level spell

Seeing this comparison, I definitely favor the DC 15. Teleporter does not need to be an almighty spellcaster class, and they can spend additional points to overcome the difficulty or even learn counterspell. Great job picking 15!

"As an action this effect can be used to shear the space of an area casting shatter"

Your almighty redirect power also casts shatter? Why?

"but pulling creatures towards the centered points."

And it has some sort of gravitational ability? What type of magic? What's the range of how far it grabs people? How strong is the grab, inescapable or can strong people can fight it (and at what DC)? Is it instantaneous, or work over time? This is an extremely loaded power that should not exist if it's not written with a comprehensive spell description. Plus, the very idea of redirecting a fireball is already so cool, I'm not sure that it needs to be combined with shatter and some kind of black hole effect.

"It casts as a 3rd level spell at 5 teleport points and increases range by 5feet for each spell level as well as normal damage."

So unlike every other feature in the game, this has a dynamic casting range that varies depending on the level of spell being countered? On top of that, it also increases "normal damage" (by how much? and do you mean the force damage, or something else)? This is getting super complex.

I'm afraid this feature has so many conflicting mechanics, I can only recommend simplifying the entire paragraph (and dropping several of its mechanics) and putting it into spell format, which makes complex powers easier to read.

Planar Studies[edit]

You deepen your arcane knowledge of the school of conjuration and school of transmutation to further augment your abilities. In your studies, you have unearthed the secret to inflicting your teleportation spells on unwilling targets, and even learnt a few additional spells from these schools.

At 11th level, you can force your teleportation spells on unwilling creatures. When you cast a teleporter spell that normally causes yourself to teleport (the spell cannot involve any form of planar shifting), you may force a creature within 60 feet of you that you can see to succeed on a Constitution saving throw against your Spell Save DC or be affected by the spell instead. The designated creature is considered the spell caster whenever the spell effect normally refers to you, with the same exceptions as described in the Friendly Phasing feature.

In addition, when you gain this feature, you learn three spells of your choice from any class's spell list (the three needn't be from the same list) that are conjuration or transformation spells which are of a level up to your Spell Level Known. When you gain a level in this class, you can choose one of the spells you learned from this feature and replace it with another conjuration or transformation spell, which also must be of a level of up to your Spell Level Known.

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Before After

____anc:Plane Swap__

At 11th level the Plane Manipulator can force his teleportation on unwilling creatures as well. Those creatures must roll a DC constitution based on your spell save DC. Additionally the Plane Walker gains the ability to learn any transmutation or conjuration spell taught to them or that they have seen done 20 times. After this learning it takes 250 days to become proficient in the spell which becomes one of their Teleporter spells. They must also teach the creature that teaches them a Teleporter spell in order to complete the swap. This is not subject to the spell seen 20 times.

____ Planar Studies ____

You deepen your arcane knowledge of the school of conjuration and school of transmutation to further augment your abilities. In your studies, you have unearthed the secret to inflicting your teleportation spells on unwilling targets, and even learnt a few additional spells from these schools.

At 11th level, you can force your teleportation spells on unwilling creatures. When you cast a teleporter spell that normally causes yourself to teleport (the spell cannot involve any form of planar shifting), you may force a creature within 60 feet of you that you can see to succeed on a Constitution saving throw against your Spell Save DC or be affected by the spell instead. The designated creature is considered the spell caster whenever the spell effect normally refers to you, with the same exceptions as described in the Friendly Phasing feature.

In addition, when you gain this feature, you learn three spells of your choice from any class's spell list (the three needn't be from the same list) that are conjuration or transformation spells which are of a level up to your Spell Level Known. When you gain a level in this class, you can choose one of the spells you learned from this feature and replace it with another conjuration or transformation spell, which also must be of a level of up to your Spell Level Known.

Reasons for Change(s)
Let's look at the three parts of this feature...
1. Force teleportation on unwilling creatures

Expanded for clarity. Specified that it has to be a teleportation spell of theirs that doesn't involve planar shifts (or players will banish BBEG to an obscure realm instantly), and use similar rules to the Friendly Phasing feature.

2. Learn any Conjuration or Transmutation spell

Learning spells from other classes is nothing new to D&D. However, the 250-day rule has a few glaring risks:

A. Unusable for most players.

We all know the in-game rate of time can vary campaign to campaign, and that means these spells will become available for some players and never appear for others. That inconsistency alone is a problem, but when we remember that plenty of D&D sessions only see 0 to 2 days of in-game time pass in a single session, that means almost all players won't see these new spells until at least 100 sessions are played (assuming the campaign hasn't ended by then).

B. Allows unlimited prepared/known spells.

With no restrictions on how many spells can be learned, a smart min-max player would just pay or manipulate a wizard to teach every non-material-component-consuming spell imaginable, so 250 days later they can access 150+ transmutation+conjuration spells anytime they want (yes, there's that many in 5th edition). That's more than even a Wizard can prepare for a day. Although a good DM would never allow such a thing, better to not tempt the player in the first place with a super-abusable mechanic.

C. Bypasses thematic/class spell restrictions.

The ability to teach any spellcasting class any teleporter spell is also a little unlike D&D universe behavior; most classes can only access magic applicable to their class theme, and only special classes (like Warlock) get cross-class spells.

As a result, I recommend replacing this entire mechanic with a similar cross-class spell mechanic from the Warlock class (Pact of the Tome), but still focused on transmutation+conjuration spells.

3. The "Planar Swap" name.

The feature name does not entirely represent the effects under it. While there was a "learning swap" (which I encourage you to remove), it has nothing to do with a "planar swap" nor does forced teleportation sound like it belongs under that name. As a result, I have recommended new flavor text for the introduction and a new feature name to match.

Planar Disruption[edit]

At 17th level, you can attempt to disrupt magic in the immediate area as an action. Spend 13 teleport points and make a DC 25 Charisma saving throw. On a successful save, for each spell within 120 feet of you, and for each spell that is cast or enters within 120 feet of you until the end of your next turn, roll a d20. If the roll is 10 or higher, the spell fails. All other magical effects are likewise susceptible to disruption by this feature.

Compare Changes 
Before After

At 17th level the Plane Manipulator can pay 13 teleport points to attempt a DC 25 charisma save. On success all magical effects beginning within 120ft must roll a d20 until the end of the Plane Manipulator’s next turn. On an even roll the effect is lost but the spell is counted as used.

At 17th level, you can attempt to disrupt magic in the immediate area as an action. Spend 13 teleport points and make a DC 25 Charisma saving throw. On a successful save, for each spell within 120 feet of you, and for each spell that is cast or enters within 120 feet of you until the end of your next turn, roll a d20. If the roll is 10 or higher, the spell fails. All other magical effects are likewise susceptible to disruption by this feature.

Reasons for Change(s)
Besides some general grammar/wording suggestions, here's a few minor points:

1. The use of the open-ended "magical effect" phrase (which is not really defined in D&D) is great.

We basically want all forms of magic to fail in the area no matter how big or small.

2. Even/odds is a fine mechanic, but reusing a similar mechanic (from death saving throws) has an advantage.

The death saving mechanic is already familiar to all players, and super easy to remember. More importantly, it has a 55% chance of success (as opposed to a perfect 50/50)... giving a slight edge in the player's favor that will be appreciated by players (and kind of expected, giving that we're at Level 17 demigod power levels now).

3. Saying "the spell is counted as used" isn't neccesary.

Not even counterspell gets that specific, since casting any spell (even if the spell fails) always results in an expended spell slot.

Teleporter Spell List[edit]

You have access to the spells on this teleporter spell list. Your subclass may grant you additional spells.

Cantrips

minor step, short warp

1st Level

(no applicable spells)

2nd Level

misty step

3rd Level

blink, thunder step

4th Level

dimension door, warping step

5th Level

far step, traumatic teleport

6th Level

arcane gate, misty gate

7th Level

demiplane portal, etherealness, plane shift, teleport

8th Level

air removal, demiplane, maze

9th Level

gate, mass traumatic teleport

Compare Changes 
Before After

You know all of the spells on the basic Teleporter spell list and additional spells based on your subclass.

_Cantrips Minor Step, Short Warp

_1st Level '

_2nd Level Misty Step

_3rd Level Blink, Thunder Step

_4th Level Dimension Door, Warping Step

_5th Level Far Step, Traumatic Teleporter

_6th Level Arcane Gate, Misty Gate

_7th Level Astral Shift, Demiplane Portal, Etherealness, Plane Shift, Teleport

_8th Level Air Removal, Demiplane, Maze

_9th Level Gate, Mass Traumatic Teleport

You have access to the spells on this teleporter spell list. Your subclass may grant you additional spells.

_Cantrips minor step, short warp

_1st Level (no applicable spells)

_2nd Level misty step

_3rd Level blink, thunder step

_4th Level dimension door, warping step

_5th Level far step, traumatic teleport

_6th Level arcane gate, misty gate

_7th Level demiplane portal, etherealness, plane shift, teleport

_8th Level air removal, demiplane, maze

_9th Level gate, mass traumatic teleport

Reasons for Change(s)
The following changes are suggested...

1. The homebrew rules on When to Italicize and Capitalize make it clear that spells are supposed to be in lowercase, so let's make that change.

2. Linked the spells to their appropriate pages, to make the list more useful.

3. astral shift is a strange spell. Normally to visit another plane (using plane shift), you first need a tuning fork that's attuned to that plane, and this may either cost a lot or require its own quest to acquire. This is good because it affords the DM some time to prepare this other universe, or direct them elsewhere if they feel the party isn't ready. There's also the astral projection spell, which has a lot of fun mechanics to hype up the strangeness and dangers of astral travel... which astral shift completely disregards. If the GM is really ready to send the party on a multi-planar adventure, he can bestow upon them the Legendary item Cubic Gate - granting access to 6 different planes! And then there's this astral shift spell... which grants access to NINETEEN different planes (I feel sorry for the DM). That means this spell is worth the equivalent of 3 Legendary items! It is a pain to DM, it trivializes all the amazing plane-based abilities/items already out there, and I would argue it doesn't fit in the D&D universe with the teleporter's other powers.

Multiclassing[edit]

Prerequisites. To qualify for multiclassing into the teleporter class, you must meet these prerequisites: 13 Charisma

Proficiencies. When you multiclass into the teleporter class, you gain the following proficiencies: simple weapons, martial glove weapons, light armor.

Compare Changes 
Before After

<!--Provide any information or prerequisites on multiclassing into this class beyond the rules in the PHB, Chapter 6.-->

Prerequisites. To qualify for multiclassing into the Teleporter class, you must meet these prerequisites: Charisma 13

Proficiencies. When you multiclass into the <!-class name-> class, you gain the following proficiencies: Simple Weapons, gloved martial weapons, light armor.

Prerequisites. To qualify for multiclassing into the teleporter class, you must meet these prerequisites: 13 Charisma

Proficiencies. When you multiclass into the teleporter class, you gain the following proficiencies: simple weapons, martial glove weapons, light armor.

Reasons for Change(s)
Swapped a couple words to match what featured homebrew classes do, added links where possible, and fixed the broken HTML comments.
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