User:Ref3rence/Multi-Work Shonen Tabletop/Mechanics

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Rule 0[edit]

Like all good ttrpgs, Dragon Ball: Grand Tour operates on Rule Zero. All rules are up to you, the Supreme Kai, in order to ensure that fun is had by all players in your game. It’s also important that you have at least a vague understanding of another typical ttrpg like Dungeons and Dragons. For the sake of it being stated, the Supreme Kai (SK) of the game (the player, not the entity) is the equivalent of a Dungeon Master.

General Dice Rules[edit]

For the most part, the only die you will need is a d100 or set of percentile dice. Most rolls take the form of contests in which the initiating entity (attacker, a trap, etc.) rolls their dice, declares the percentage of their feature (detailed in leveling) equal to the roll, and then the target entity does the same. If the target’s result is greater than the initiator’s, they succeed.

Combat[edit]

At the beginning of combat, creatures compare their Sight percentage of their Speed score. Entities then take turns in order from greatest to least. Each creature takes a number of turns each round equal to the number of factors of ten of their Speed score (1-99 take 1 turn, 100-999 take 2 turns, etc.). On each turn, creatures can take 1 action, 1 bonus action, 1 free action*, and move their total movement distance*, or take 1 full turn action. They can choose to either take all of their turns consecutively or “hold” any amount of turns, taking them when a specific trigger is met.

They may also take a charging (detailed in leveling) round on their first turn each round, in which the charge count of the technique they are charging increases by 1/10 of one of their Mental Features. During this, they can only move up to the technique’s charging distance.

Attacking[edit]

As an action, a creature initiates a contest using their Strength score. The target may either contest with their Speed score, their Sturdiness score in which they automatically roll a 50, or use any technique labeled “Defense”. If the target fails, they take bludgeoning damage equal to another rolled percentage of the initiator’s Strength score.

Damage Types[edit]

The following is a list of types of damage a creature can take in addition to those listed in D&D 5e.

  • Energy: a form of raw damaging energy generated by bio-electricity.
  • Internal: lingering damage caused by substantial damage inside the body.

Conditions[edit]

Conditions alter a creature's capabilities in a variety of ways and can arise as a result of a spell, a class feature, a monster's attack, or other effect. Most conditions, such as blinded, are impairments, but a few, such as invisible, can be advantageous.
A condition lasts either until it is countered (the prone condition is countered by standing up, for example) or for a duration specified by the effect that imposed the condition.
If multiple effects impose the same condition on a creature, each instance of the condition has its own duration, but the condition's effects don't get worse. A creature either has a condition or doesn't.
The following definitions specify what happens to a creature while it is subjected to a condition.

Berserk
  • You must attack the closest creature you can see on each of your turns. You may attempt a
Blinded
  • A blinded creature can't see and automatically fails any ability check that requires sight.
  • Attack rolls against the creature have advantage, and the creature's attack rolls have disadvantage.
Charmed
  • A charmed creature can't attack the charmer or target the charmer with harmful abilities or magical effects.
  • The charmer has advantage on any ability check to interact socially with the creature.
Deafened
  • A deafened creature can't hear and automatically fails any ability check that requires hearing.
Exhaustion

Some special abilities and environmental hazards, such as starvation and the long-term effects of freezing or scorching temperatures, can lead to a special condition called exhaustion. Exhaustion is measured in six levels. An effect can give a creature one or more levels of exhaustion, as specified in the effect’s description.

Level Effect
1 Disadvantage on skill checks
2 Speed halved
3 Disadvantage on Physical Feature rolls.
4 Hit point maximum halved
5 Speed reduced to 0
6 Death

If an already exhausted creature suffers another effect that causes exhaustion, its current level of exhaustion increases by the amount specified in the effect's description.
A creature suffers the effect of its current level of exhaustion as well as all lower levels. For example, a creature suffering level 2 exhaustion has its speed halved and has disadvantage on ability checks.
An effect that removes exhaustion reduces its level as specified in the effect's description, with all exhaustion effects ending if a creature’s exhaustion level is reduced below 1.
Finishing a long rest reduces a creature's exhaustion level by 1, provided that the creature has also ingested some food and drink.
Common sources of exhaustion are as follows:

  • Spending 1 hour in temperatures not between 0 and 100 degrees Fahrenheit without proper considerations incurs a Sturdiness (Bodily Mastery) contest against 25 + 1 per degree away from the normally survivable range. On a failure, the creature gains 1 level of exhaustion.
Frightened
  • A frightened creature has disadvantage on ability checks and attack rolls while the source of its fear is within line of sight.
  • The creature can't willingly move closer to the source of its fear.
Grappling
  • A grappling creature's speed is decreased by 25.
  • The condition ends if the grappler is incapacitated (see the condition).
  • The condition also ends if an effect removes the grappled creature from the reach of the grappler or grappling effect.
  • Any actions the creature takes has disadvantage.
Grappled
  • A grappled creature's speed becomes 0, and it can't benefit from any bonus to its speed.
  • The condition ends if the grappler is incapacitated (see the condition).
  • The condition also ends if an effect removes the grappled creature from the reach of the grappler or grappling effect.
  • Any actions the creature takes has disadvantage.
Incapacitated
  • An incapacitated creature can't take actions or reactions.
Invisible
  • An invisible creature is impossible to see without the aid of magic or a special sense. For the purpose of hiding, the creature is heavily obscured. The creature's location can be detected by any noise it makes or any tracks it leaves.
  • Attack rolls against the creature have disadvantage, and the creature's attack rolls have advantage.
Paralyzed
  • A paralyzed creature is incapacitated (see the condition) and can't move or speak.
  • The creature automatically fails Strength and Speed contests.
  • Attack rolls against the creature have advantage.
  • Any attack that hits the creature deals twice as much damage if the attacker is within 5 feet of the creature.
Petrified
  • A petrified creature is transformed, along with any nonmagical object it is wearing or carrying, into a solid inanimate substance (usually stone). Its weight increases by a factor of ten, and it ceases aging.
  • The creature is incapacitated (see the condition), can't move or speak, and is unaware of its surroundings.
  • Attack rolls against the creature have advantage.
  • The creature automatically fails Strength and Speed saving throws.
  • The creature takes half as much damage from all sources.
  • The creature is immune to poison and disease, although a poison or disease already in its system is suspended, not neutralized.
Poisoned
  • A poisoned creature has disadvantage on attack rolls and contests.
Prone
  • A prone creature's only movement option is to crawl, unless it stands up and thereby ends the condition.
  • The creature has disadvantage on attack rolls.
  • An attack roll against the creature has advantage if the attacker is within 5 feet of the creature. Otherwise, the attack roll has disadvantage.
Restrained
  • A restrained creature's speed becomes 0, and it can't benefit from any bonus to its speed.
  • Attack rolls against the creature have advantage, and the creature's attack rolls have disadvantage.
  • The creature has disadvantage on Speed saving throws.
Stunned
  • A stunned creature is incapacitated (see the condition), can't move, and can speak only falteringly.
  • The creature automatically fails Strength and Speed saving throws.
  • Attack rolls against the creature have advantage.
Unconscious
  • An unconscious creature is incapacitated (see the condition), can't move or speak, and is unaware of its surroundings
  • The creature drops whatever it's holding and falls prone.
  • The creature automatically fails Strength and Speed saving throws.
  • Attack rolls against the creature have advantage.
  • Any attack that hits the creature deals twice as much damage if the attacker is within 5 feet of the creature.
Bleeding
  • At the end of their turn, a bleeding creature takes necrotic damage equal to 1/10 the damage they took from the attack that inflicted the condition.
  • The creature may attempt to end the condition and stop bleeding by succeeding on a Sturdiness (Constitution) contest equal to the roll that inflicted this condition.
  • Any healing received reduces the damage the creature will take from bleeding. Once the damage value reaches 0, the condition ends.
Burning
  • A creature or object that comes under the effect of the burning condition may feel an agonizing pain in the area affected as well as flames catching onto them. The burning creature takes 10% of the initial fire, lightning, or acid damage they were dealt at the start of each of their turns for a number of rounds equal to 10% of the damage dealt, rounded down. This effect can be hindered by environmental conditions such as rain and creatures affected can end the condition on them by taking an action to pat out the flames.
Burned
  • A creature that comes under the effect of the burned condition takes one of the three degrees of this condition based on the amount of fire, lightning, or acid damage they took equal to their maximum hit points. When you take a degree of burned you take all lower degrees of burn. For example, if you had 100 hit points and you took 51 fire damage, you would be affected by second as well as first degree.
  • First Degree: 25%: Your skin becomes bright pink or very red. You have disadvantage on your next weapon attack roll. You have disadvantage on Soul skill contests.
  • Second Degree: 50%: Your skin becomes red as blisters begin to form on the affected area. You have disadvantage on Speed contests. Your speed is also halved.
  • Third Degree: 75%: Your skin is seared black as the fire near consumes you. Make a Sturdiness (Bodily Mastery) contests against the source. If you fail, the pain becomes too much to handle and you pass out for an hour, falling unconscious. On a successful save you are not affected.
  • If you regain hit points below the degree threshold, you lose the condition.
Confused
  • The creature has disadvantage on Mental Feature contests.
  • The contest that induced the condition must be repeated at the end of each of there turns and when they use a technique. On a failure, the technique fails. On a success, this condition ends.
Frozen
  • A frozen creature has been in contact with extreme cold. When a creature is frozen, their speed is reduced to zero, and if they remain in this condition for more than 3 turns, they take 10 cold damage for every additional turn they remain frozen.

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